Assembly Church Assembles Audio System - ProSoundNetwork.com

Assembly Church Assembles Audio System

Mesa, AZ (February 25, 2005)--The Mesa First Assembly of God in Mesa, AZ has a rapidly growing ministry, so it created a new centerpiece sanctuary which opened last summer. The move into the new facility was quite welcomed following a temporary stay in the church’s campus gymnasium, which suffered from poor sound. A new audio system which makes extensive use of QSC amplifiers ensured that the church would meet audio expectations.
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Mesa, AZ (February 25, 2005)--The Mesa First Assembly of God in Mesa, AZ has a rapidly growing ministry, so it created a new centerpiece sanctuary which opened last summer. The move into the new facility was quite welcomed following a temporary stay in the church’s campus gymnasium, which suffered from poor sound. A new audio system which makes extensive use of QSC amplifiers ensured that the church would meet audio expectations.

"Based upon some less-than-pleasant experiences encountered during its time spent in the gymnasium, the church adamantly insisted that acoustics be done right in the new sanctuary," reported Jeff Miller of El Cajon, California-based Sound Technology Consultants, Inc. "They would make no exceptions, even if it meant deferring some of the funds earmarked for technology in order to make it happen."

STC's Mesa First Assembly of God audio design was implemented by Sunbelt Scenic Studios of Tempe, AZ, utilizing a mono central cluster supported by a pair of subwoofers. "QSC amps played a big role in enabling us to bring the project in according to the mandates of the budget without making any sacrifices in quality," he said, citing one of the main reasons behind buying a dozen various CX1102, CX902, and CX302 V amps. "We also saved space thanks to the standard two-rackspace residency requirements--we didn't have to buy nearly as many racks. In the wider scheme of things, that freed up additional funds for use elsewhere. Also, they can be interfaced with computer control and a number of DSP processing modules, and various input options are available as well using either XLR or Phoenix connectors. These are the extras that will make accommodating future needs that much easier.

"Everything was assembled with the future in mind," Miller noted. "Conduit and mounting locations for cameras have already been established for the day when broadcast capabilities become reality, we're ready for image magnification systems, and for when the room will receive an addition nearly doubling it in size. If all goes according to plan, accommodating tomorrow's technological needs will be as easy as simply snapping additional components into place."

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