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Bag End Helps Prove How Low Bass Singer Storms Can Go - ProSoundNetwork.com

Bag End Helps Prove How Low Bass Singer Storms Can Go

Gresham, OR (February 26, 2004)--A popular a cappella Christian music group, Rescue has produced four albums in the last four years and has made hundreds of appearances, from churches and colleges to large events such as the National Church Music Conference. Rescue consists of three (out of four) members named Jason--Jason Overstreet, Jason McKenney and Jason Pearce--and bass Tim Storms, who holds the Guinness Book world record for singing the lowest note ever produced by a human voice. Searching for a loudspeaker that could reproduce such low notes, Storms contacted Bag End, and arranged to audition an INFRAsub system at Bag End’s factory outside Chicago.
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Gresham, OR (February 26, 2004)--A popular a cappella Christian music group, Rescue has produced four albums in the last four years and has made hundreds of appearances, from churches and colleges to large events such as the National Church Music Conference. Rescue consists of three (out of four) members named Jason--Jason Overstreet, Jason McKenney and Jason Pearce--and bass Tim Storms, who holds the Guinness Book world record for singing the lowest note ever produced by a human voice. Searching for a loudspeaker that could reproduce such low notes, Storms contacted Bag End, and arranged to audition an INFRAsub system at Bag End’s factory outside Chicago.

Storms, who says his voice has been deep as long as he can remember, became interested in determining just how low his voice could actually go, and contacted the Guinness people in October of 2000. The result was a specially arranged recording session employing sensitive measuring equipment and a panel of two college music faculty members.

"We concentrated on a couple of octaves below the piano," said Storms. "I started at subcontra B, the last B on the piano. I sang that and slid down to the B two octaves below that which is 8 Hz." Storms remembered he had heard of a loudspeaker system that claimed it could reproduce a flat response down to 8 Hz. Subsequently, when one of their tours took them to the Chicago area, Storms arranged to audition an INFRAsub system at the Bag End factory.

Storms and the rest of the group liked what they heard and purchased a complete subwoofer system from Bag End, a pair of D18E-R double-18 subwoofer cabinets and an INFRA-M 8 Hz signal processor.

"As a bass singer, I am very picky when it comes to choosing the right subs," Storms said. "After singing through many different brands of subs over the years, I've come to the conclusion that as far as frequency response, tone, tightness of very single note, and power, Bag End subs are by far the most amazing sub I've ever had the pleasure of using."

Bag End Loudspeaker Systems
www.bagend.com