Bang On A Cans iLost Objects/i Gets Help From DPA Mics

Lyons, CO (December 29, 2004)--Bang On A Can’s Lost Objects, performed recently at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), fused an eclectic array of musical ensembles including a 30 piece baroque orchestra, a rock band and three operatic singers. The show’s FOH engineer Jody Elff used DPA’s 4088 Miniature cardioid headband microphones to highlight the voices of the show’s three lead singers over the "sonic assault" of the show’s musical ensembles.
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Lyons, CO (December 29, 2004)--Bang On A Can’s Lost Objects, performed recently at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), fused an eclectic array of musical ensembles including a 30 piece baroque orchestra, a rock band and three operatic singers. The show’s FOH engineer Jody Elff used DPA’s 4088 Miniature cardioid headband microphones to highlight the voices of the show’s three lead singers over the "sonic assault" of the show’s musical ensembles.

"The various ensembles worked together in different combinations throughout the show and this presented a substantial challenge for me as the front-of-house engineer," said Jody Elff, sound designer for Lost Objects. "The three DPA 4088 headset mics were able to handle the tremendous SPL generated by the three operatic singers, isolating those critical sonic elements from the surrounding wash of sound (even while standing directly in front of the orchestra), and sounding absolutely spectacular throughout."

















Elff added that what he found most impressive about the 4088s, aside from their unsurpassed cardioid rejection, was their quality of sound. "What comes down the line to me is absolutely un-colored and natural. The singers’ voices are flawlessly captured and that’s thrilling. The 4088 is the first headset mic for live applications that treats a musician’s voice as a fine instrument," Elff said.

Sound engineer Coz Costello, who also works as a production engineer on NBC’s Saturday Night Live, concurred with Elff regarding the 4088s’ rejection abilities. "They are fantastic," Costello exclaimed. "The DPAs very clearly relay sounds applied and reject sounds not applied."

The new DPA 4088 Miniature cardioid headband microphone was specifically designed for use in feedback prone environments. Completely adjustable, this headworn microphone with a miniature boom, which attaches to the headband frame capturing both ears, is small and lightweight, providing a secure and comfortable fit. The 4088’s sound quality, coupled with its high SPL capabilities, makes it a great choice for professionals requiring clarity, realism and increased gain before feedback.

DPA Microphones Inc. president Bruce Myers was pleased to help the unique Lost Objects production. "It’s exciting to be part of such an ambitious collaboration of musicians and artists. Lost Objects is an eclectic, diverse project and DPA is honored to contribute towards its success."

Elff said that other DPA mics used during the show included three 4021 cardioid condenser microphones suspended across the downstage edge to help reinforce the chorus as they would drift downstage at various points during the show. "Again," said Elff, "the natural sound of the mic is great and gives me the extra headroom I need to pull the chorus out over the rest of the ensemble."

DPA Microphones, Inc.
www.dpamicrophones.com