Blue World Music Living Dangerously

Austin, TX (April 24, 2007)--Almost two years ago, Blue World Music Studio owner and producer/engineer Gina Fant-Saez replaced her large-format SSL console with Dangerous Music summing and monitoring systems, and some key outboard compressors, EQs and mic pres.
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Austin, TX (April 24, 2007)--Almost two years ago, Blue World Music Studio owner and producer/engineer Gina Fant-Saez replaced her large-format SSL console with Dangerous Music summing and monitoring systems, and some key outboard compressors, EQs and mic pres.
Pictured at Blue World are (l-r): producer Sam Oliver and Gina Fant-Saez.Fant-Saez described, "I found that I was using the SSL for analog summing, and maybe some EQ. I had all the faders at unity gain, and I was using mostly plug-ins, and all the automation in Pro Tools." She did some fairly extensive testing before making this change. "Before selling the SSL, I ran three mixes: one on the board (no EQ or compression), one in-the-box mix, and one through the Dangerous system," Fant-Saez described. "I invited a handful of Austin's best engineers and producers to listen, and in blind tests, we had a unanimous decision that the Dangerous mixes beat out everything. They were simply cleaner and warmer to everyone."

Blue World Music sports a comprehensive rack containing a pair of Dangerous 2-Busses normaled to Digi 192's for 32-channels of analog summing as well as a Dangerous Mixer linked to the D2B's for external FX and reverb returns. A Dangerous Monitor and MQ complete the system by providing input and speaker switching, cue and talkback functions as well as a reference D/A converter and metering. Explaining how the console sound gets completed Fant-Saez said, "I put the Allen Smart stereo compressor on the end of the mix chain to replicate the sound of the SSL. The Allen Smart is the same compressor that the SSL console uses. Combined with my outboard gear and plug-ins it's like my large format console in a rack. We're very happy with the system."

Fant-Saez spent time at Juilliard studying music theory and has a Master's Degree in Interactive Telecommunications, as well as being a recording engineer and composer. Her secluded studio outside Austin, Blue World Music, has a relaxed atmosphere combined with a high-tech audio environment. These days, her main project is eSession, a web-based music collaboration system that allows artists, producers, songwriters and producers from around the world to collaborate with anyone they know or hire of eSession's 600-plus world class musicians and engineers. The eSession website handles all financial transactions, files transfers and real-time collaboration.

Blue World Studio's clients include Sting, Shawn Colvin, Spoon, Jimmie Vaughan, Nelly Furtado, Walt Disney Pictures, and Chris Vrenna. Fant-Saez remixed U2's hit "Elevation," written a book, Pro Tools for Musicians & Songwriters (www.protoolsformusicians.com), and is in the process of writing and producing a techno-pop project called Room 2 Breathe, teaming up with German producer Sam Oliver.

To contact Gina Fant-Saez visit Blue World Music at www.blueworldmusic.com or eSession at www.esession.com.

For more information on Dangerous equipment, visit www.dangerousmusic.com.