Brauner Mics At The Movies

Los Angeles (November 11, 2003)--Musician and producer/engineer Malcolm Luker started his engineering career while in a production partnership with Pink Floyd's Nick Mason in the mid-1970s. Engineering records with eight-track tape recorders led Luker to work on film scores, and eventually to a stint as chief engineer at the Munich studio, ARCO, where he became aware of a new line of Brauner microphones.
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Los Angeles (November 11, 2003)--Musician and producer/engineer Malcolm Luker started his engineering career while in a production partnership with Pink Floyd's Nick Mason in the mid-1970s. Engineering records with eight-track tape recorders led Luker to work on film scores, and eventually to a stint as chief engineer at the Munich studio, ARCO, where he became aware of a new line of Brauner microphones.

"This must have been about seven or eight years ago, just before I moved from Munich to L.A. I saw a number of the prototypes that would eventually become the Brauner VM1 Tube Microphone," offers Luker. "When the time was right Dirk Brauner brought three of them to the studio. We were recording a full symphony orchestra and I put three Brauner mics on the Decca tree as the main room mics and began tracking. The orchestra was in full throttle, raging away at the opening title cue. After the first take we listened to a playback. It sounded magnificent! I turned around and said, 'Hey Dirk, what do you think?' He didn't say a word--there were just tears in his eyes."

Luker's journey took him to L.A., where he became a successful scoring mixer. His recent credits include working on Matchstick Men, Pirates of the Caribbean, and We Were Soldiers. He currently owns five Brauner VM1s. "I'm very involved with many of the scores I work on, and actually co-produced the score to We Were Soldiers with the composer, Nick Glennie-Smith," said Luker. "When I bring equipment to a session I have to be convinced that it's the absolute best. The VM1 is way above the rest. I like to keep my signal path simple going from the VM1s to Grace mic-pres, and then straight into the console. For orchestral recordings, they capture the room beautifully. The mics are clear, without being overly bright. On harp, acoustic guitar, and strings, the VM1 lets you hear the wood of these instruments."

Shortly after Luker moved to L.A., he worked on Man in the Iron Mask, which Glennie-Smith also scored. "This was just after I started using the VM1s," shared Luker. "During that session, Steve Kempster, who was working in the next studio at the time, dropped in for a listen and fell in love with the VM1 instantly. He now owns Brauner VM1s, VM1 KHEs and Phantom Cs."

Transamerica Audio Group, Inc.
www.transaudiogroup.com