Chace Audio Develops 71 Methods for Blu-ray

Burbank, CA (August 8, 2008)--Chace Audio has remastered a series of recent and upcoming New Line releases into 7.1 for Blu-ray release, including Mr. Woodcock, a comedy staring Billy Bob Thornton, Seann William Scott and Susan Sarandon.
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Burbank, CA (August 8, 2008)--Chace Audio has remastered a series of recent and upcoming New Line releases into 7.1 for Blu-ray release, including Mr. Woodcock, a comedy staring Billy Bob Thornton, Seann William Scott and Susan Sarandon.

Mr. Woodcock takes advantage of the 7.1 format, which in this case features left surround side and right surround side channels in addition to L C R Ls Rs. "New Line is one of the first studios to embrace the 7.1 format for Blu-ray and the ability to present this film in this way makes a tremendous difference sonically," says Chace Project manager Doug Johnson. "7.1 gives you a lot of options for programming directionality and has a different spatial quality that delivers more depth. By having two discrete additional channels it's possible to take directional cues beyond merely the right or left speakers and actually pan them to go past the side of the viewer's head in a way never before possible."

"It's not just a matter of divergence to simply 'fill up' these additional channels," explains Chace conform/mixing engineer Wade Chamberlain, who has mixed several feature films in 7.1. "We have developed several methods here at Chace to actually unlock a whole new level of fidelity and space, especially with regard to a film's music, which opens up significantly in 7.1 and has a larger feel to it that truly envelops the audience."

Work on Mr. Woodcock began when New Line delivered the 5.1 theatrical stems. Mixing was done primarily in Pro Tools. "One of the current limitations of most DAWs and mixing consoles is that the 7.1 panning technology is currently set up for SDDS," says conform/mixing engineer Chris Reynolds. "It's difficult to fluidly pan discrete effects around the soundfield, so we had to develop a hybrid panning technique in order to pan sounds around the audience and still have it sound as organic and realistic as possible."

Chace Audio
www.chace.com