Clear Channel Radio Initiative a Success

San Antonio, TX (February 15, 2005)--Clear Channel Radio has announced broad early support for key elements of the company's "Less is More" listenership and programming initiative. Two independent listenership studies confirm the value and effectiveness of fewer programming interruptions and shorter commercial breaks to listeners.
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San Antonio, TX (February 15, 2005)--Clear Channel Radio has announced broad early support for key elements of the company's "Less is More" listenership and programming initiative. Two independent listenership studies confirm the value and effectiveness of fewer programming interruptions and shorter commercial breaks to listeners.

"Our stations sound better now than at any other time-our shorter stop sets have created a more compelling environment for listeners and a better environment for advertisers," said John Hogan, CEO of Clear Channel Radio.

More than 1200 Clear Channel Radio stations put the final elements of the company's "Less is More" initiative into effect on December 15, 2004. The program reduces interruptions, shortens commercial lengths, and makes a broad array of creative resources available to advertisers and agencies to help them create compelling commercial spots. Clear Channel Radio stations have been actively promoting the benefits to listeners for the past 30 days.

Two independent studies released recently found that listeners love the longer programming blocks, actively noticing fewer commercials, shorter commercial breaks and more music. The studies also found that listeners are retaining advertising content better in the improved listening environment.

Both studies confirm that "Less is More" listeners noticed fewer commercials, shorter commercial breaks and more music. In addition, the study found that 30 and 15-second spots provide advertisers with a very effective means to reach listeners. In fact, results suggest that a compelling message can be recalled and retained no matter what the length.

There had been debate in the radio industry whether the traditional 60-second commercial remains the most effective way to engage radio listeners. Other broadcast mediums, most notably television and radio stations in countries other than the U.S., moved away from the dominant use of 60-second commercials several years ago.

Clear Channel Communications
www.clearchannel.com