Dave Matthews Tour Clears The Air

New York (July 24, 2006)--In 2004, a tour bus used by The Dave Matthews Band famously dumped human waste on a boatload of tourists while going over a Chicago bridge, but these days, the band is doing something to clean the environment instead while on tour. Now the DMB is working with NativeEnergy and Clean Air-Cool Planet to offset 100 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from all of its touring activities since 1991.
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New York (July 24, 2006)--In 2004, a tour bus used by The Dave Matthews Band famously dumped human waste on a boatload of tourists while going over a Chicago bridge, but these days, the band is doing something to clean the environment instead while on tour. Now the DMB is working with NativeEnergy and Clean Air-Cool Planet to offset 100 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from all of its touring activities since 1991.

By offsetting the CO2 pollution that touring activities such as transporting gear, powering stages and air travel generate, the band aims to fight global warming and help "Native America begin to restore sustainable homeland economies in balance with the Earth," according to a statement.

With NativeEnergy, the band ensures that its CO2 offsetting contributes directly to the construction of new, Native American and Native Alaskan renewable energy generators whose clean electricity will displace energy that would otherwise have to come from polluting coal-fired plants, reducing CO2 and other pollution on behalf of the band. In addition, DMB's purchase supports financially additional offsets from wind farms in the Great Plains, that displace electricity on one of the most intensely coal-fired grids in the country.

By offsetting an estimated 18,000 tons of CO2, the band has the same global warming impact as eliminating 36 million average car miles. A large majority of DMB's purchase from NativeEnergy is to offset emissions from performances ranging from their very first engagements in 1991 to the 300,000 fan show at the Park Pop Festival in Holland (1998), but the total CO2 footprint also includes non-concert performances on the Grammy's, Tonight Show, and a Presidential Inaugural Ball.

DMB has worked with NativeEnergy since 2002, when it first mitigated 2,174 tons of CO2 from the 2002 summer tour as part of the One Sweet Whirled global warming campaign, a partnership between Dave Matthews Band, Ben & Jerry's, and SaveOurEnvironment.org. These investments helped to build the Rosebud Sioux Tribe wind turbine, the first Native American-owned and operated large-scale wind turbine.

NativeEnergy
www.nativeenergy.com