dbx and Effanel Provide Winning Sound For iSurvivor All-Stars/i Season Finale

Salt Lake City, UT (July 1, 2004)--When Effanel Music was enlisted to mix sound for the season finale of the hit TV show Survivor All-Stars, this team of audio experts made sure to bring along dbx Quantum II signal processors. During shoots at Madison Square Garden and Chelsea Studios in May, Effanel’s OSR Mobile Recording Studio handled production duties for shows in which the "Sole Survivor" of the riveting season was determined.
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Salt Lake City, UT (July 1, 2004)--When Effanel Music was enlisted to mix sound for the season finale of the hit TV show Survivor All-Stars, this team of audio experts made sure to bring along dbx Quantum II signal processors. During shoots at Madison Square Garden and Chelsea Studios in May, Effanel’s OSR Mobile Recording Studio handled production duties for shows in which the "Sole Survivor" of the riveting season was determined.

The production called for 18 cast members to be connected with redundant lavalier microphones, and for the host to use both lavalier and hand-held mics. In all, 64 inputs passed through the OSR remote truck, ultimately reaching viewers in millions of homes. Everyone involved rated the show’s sound as superb, thanks in large part to the speed, flexibility, and power offered by the dbx Quantum II signal processors chosen by Effanel Music.

Jorge Silva mixed the Survivor All-Stars finale in the Effanel mobile truck at both locations, sending the signal out to broadcast as well as recording it for archive. In addition to mixing all of the participants’ microphones, Effanel also mixed the program’s prerecorded and live music, generated by a small combo playing the show’s walk-on, walk-off, and bumper music. "The dbx Quantum II processors were critical to making this show sound as good as it did," commented Joel Singer, general manager of Effanel Music. "With as many as 64 inputs constantly going, we needed to be able to jump around between sources. The Quantum II allowed us to spend time getting the absolute best sound for each input, microphone, and source, so that when the it came time to go on-air, we had each channel dialed in perfectly. The unit’s digital recall ability let us instantly switch to the preset parameter settings we had arrived at earlier."

Furthermore, said Singer, the comprehensiveness of the Quantum II’s onboard processing, including full dynamics and EQ, let Effanel dedicate one of the stereo units to each of the three main microphone groups: music, game participants, and host group. "This is a show with a lot of high-decibel yelling that occurs very, very suddenly," Singer explained. "The Quantum II can grab level spikes smoothly, without ever affecting the basic tonality of the sound, but is still able to add that very special dbx sonic touch. We also used the Quantum II as a ‘brick wall’ limiter for the final-mix L-R output from the truck," added Singer. "That’s an application on which we have used the Quantum II for every Survivor show we’ve mixed. It’s the best processor you could want to work with for a show with as many dynamic elements as Survivor."

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