Feeling Pink Floyds iPulse/i

New York (August 11, 2006)--Most concert DVDs offer little in the way of extras other than a discography or maybe a bonus track or two. Re-releasing the 1995 home video of the same name, however, the new Pink Floyd In Concert: Pulse 2-DVD set (Columbia) comes packaged with more extras than bricks in the proverbial wall. Along side typical bonus features like alternate songs, the tour's itinerary and such, are some unusual items, including a few aimed at folks who know a bit about the concert production industry.
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New York (August 11, 2006)--Most concert DVDs offer little in the way of extras other than a discography or maybe a bonus track or two. Re-releasing the 1995 home video of the same name, however, the new Pink Floyd In Concert: Pulse 2-DVD set (Columbia) comes packaged with more extras than bricks in the proverbial wall. Along side typical bonus features like alternate songs, the tour's itinerary and such, are some unusual items, including a few aimed at folks who know a bit about the concert production industry.

The heart of the set, of course, is the David Mallet-directed concert film, documenting the band on its 1994 Division Bell tour; the show, recorded on October 20th, 1994, during Pink Floyd's two-week stand at London's Earls Court, is split into halves--one half comprised of various fan favorites and the other, a complete run-through of Dark Side of the Moon.

Under "Tour Stuff" is a section of stage design diagrams, concept paintings and blueprints depicting where everything from the lights to the giant circular screen to the loudspeaker stacks were to be placed. Meanwhile, another extra, "Bootlegging the Bootleggers," edits together footage apparently confiscated from brazen videotaping fans, with desk recordings dubbed underneath them. Other pluses on Pulse include the complete screen films for 16 songs.

Best for aspiring roadwarriors, though, is an 'on-the-road' documentary of sorts, "Say Goodbye to Life as We Know It," followed by a second, hidden-track documentary, "Wiggy's Quest." Compiled from home video footage by an unidentified crew member (this writer guesses it might be someone on one of the steel crews), the two shorts capture rehearsals, hotel ennui, staging highlights, moderate shenanigans and the ever-popular "quest for a few pints."

--Clive Young

Pink Floyd
www.sonymusic.com/artists/PinkFloyd/

Columbia Records
www.columbiarec.com