Film Score Mixer/Record Producer Chooses ATC

Hollywood, CA (May 20, 2004)--Scoring mixer/record producer Steve Kempster has been on a quest to find a great mid-field monitor system that would sound great for his film scoring dates, his commercial sessions and also for his record production work. After many auditions, trials and extensive consultations with a number of manufacturers, he purchased an LCR set of ATC SCM100ASL Pro and an SCM0.1/15 Pro subwoofer.
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Hollywood, CA (May 20, 2004)--Scoring mixer/record producer Steve Kempster has been on a quest to find a great mid-field monitor system that would sound great for his film scoring dates, his commercial sessions and also for his record production work. After many auditions, trials and extensive consultations with a number of manufacturers, he purchased an LCR set of ATC SCM100ASL Pro and an SCM0.1/15 Pro subwoofer.

Kempster explained: "For my work I'm a studio on wheels. My racks of gear and I are in a different room from project to project. My dream was a system that could handle a lot of gain with loads of headroom and could still survive the abuse loudspeakers take during a tracking date. I needed something that was tough and great sounding. The design and idea behind the ATCs is that they are the gold standard. I can depend on them in any situation."

The proof is in the pudding goes the adage, and Kempster continued, "I produced the band Sky Farm, mixed three films and a number of commercials all on the ATCs and everything has translated beautifully. So my confidence level is extremely high! With the 100s I find the imaging is breathtaking. The soundfield is so defined and exactly the way it is on the sound stage. I also find the 'sweet spot' is wide both vertically and horizontally making it great for my clients and artists to also enjoy the sound equally over a fairly wide area. These speakers somehow maintain the same relationship between low, mid and high frequencies at all volumes better than any speaker I've worked on. If I was mixing a record, the vocal sound, characteristic and position in the mix stays exactly the same--dead on from quiet to earthshaking room volumes."

Another big consideration is the transition from film work to record work. There is a big jump for monitoring because most film score mixing is done through the X Curve--a deliberate roll-off of high frequencies (in the monitor path) to simulate the speaker playback systems in movie theatres. Kempster said, "What ATC is doing now is developing and building multi-stage X Curve filters for my 100s. Being able to accommodate this change for me, and build a filter to the high standards of ATC, was a significant reason for me to go with them."

ATC is distributed in the U.S. by the Transamerica Audio Group.

Transamerica Audio Group
www.transaudiogroup.com