Glasgow Makes The Connection

Glasgow, Scotland (February 6, 2004)--January saw the arrival of Celtic Connections 2004, the 11th edition of Glasgow’s international traditional music festival, featuring artists as varied as The Dubliners, Martin Stephenson, Capercaillie, Bernard Butler, Joan Baez, and others. The festival brings in more than 100,000 attendees every year, and the the economic impact on the city now exceeds £3 million during the normally quiet post Christmas period.
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Glasgow, Scotland (February 6, 2004)--January saw the arrival of Celtic Connections 2004, the 11th edition of Glasgow’s international traditional music festival, featuring artists as varied as The Dubliners, Martin Stephenson, Capercaillie, Bernard Butler, Joan Baez, and others. The festival brings in more than 100,000 attendees every year, and the the economic impact on the city now exceeds £3 million during the normally quiet post Christmas period.

James Grant, ex-leader of the eighties pop band Love and Money, headlined a typical evening’s concert during the festival, with a performance at The Arches. The two-hour set with accompanyment from Donald Shaw, Monica Queen, Ewan Vernal and Signet, found the singer running through his solo work, Love and Money tunes, and songs from his upcoming Vertical/Sanctuary CD, tentatively titled Holy Love.

Engineer Cammy Young manned the faders of Yamaha PM4000 desk at the FOH position for the show. Meanwhile a Soundcraft Series Four 40-channel mixer was used at stageside, sending sound to a 12-wedge monitor rig. A selection of Shure SM58 mics were used on vocals, while Neumann 87s were used to capture piano and accordion. The stage mics reached the desks thanks to a 32-line multicore cable with custom shielding, as the hall sits beneath Glasgow Central Station’s outgoing trains, creating phenomenal interference problems which the venue has overcome.


Celtic Connections
www.celticconnections.co.uk