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Grammys Get Dangerous

Edmeston, NY (January 4, 2008)--Three producers and engineers who believe in Dangerous Music equipment have projects nominated for multiple 2007 Grammy Awards: Jerry Harrison, Robert Carranza and David Kahne.

Edmeston, NY (January 4, 2008)–Three producers and engineers who believe in Dangerous Music equipment have projects nominated for multiple 2007 Grammy Awards: Jerry Harrison, Robert Carranza and David Kahne.

Harrison is nominated for Kenny Wayne Shepherd’s Ten Days Out: Blues From the Backroads (Best Traditional Blues Album, Best Long Form Music Video); Robert Carranza, for Ozomatli’s Don’t Mess With The Dragon (Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical) and David Kahne, for Paul McCartney’s Memory Almost Full (Best Pop Vocal Album, Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, for “Dance Tonight,” and Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance, for “Only Mama Knows”).

The 50th Annual Grammy Awards show is scheduled for February 10, 2008 on CBS.

All three producers and engineers have Dangerous Music equipment in their studios. Harrison records and mixes in stereo and 5.1 surround with his three Dangerous 2-Bus analog summing units. Carranza’s rig consists of the Dangerous 2-Bus, Dangerous Monitor, Dangerous MQ and Dangerous Master. Kahne utilizes four Dangerous 2-Bus units for 64 inputs of analog summing, a Dangerous Monitor and the Dangerous MQ.

“I had been mixing extensively with DAWs, but I never felt they gave me the sound that I wanted,” says Carranza. “I went on a mission to try all the different summing amps out there and when I hit the Dangerous I said ‘That’s it!’ I’m a snob when it comes to speakers. I’ve tested pretty much every monitor controller and nothing comes close to the Dangerous Monitor. [Dangerous Music equipment designer] Chris Muth is a genius. The equipment sounds amazing!”

“Having mastered so many records at Sterling Sound, [engineer] E.T. Thorngren and I were well aware of Chris Muth’s ability to create exemplary analog circuits,” Harrison states. “When we found out about his 2-Bus, we were among the first in line. When we went to 5.1, we got two more. We haven’t looked back.”

“Dangerous was the first to make boxes like these,” Kahne adds, “and in my opinion they’re still the best. No color, no distortion, completely transparent with more headroom than I can ever use.”

Dangerous Music
www.dangerousmusic.com

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