Half-Year Concert Ticket Tallies Arrive

New York (July 5, 2005)--As the calendar page turns to close out the first half of 2005, the concert industry is already anxiously turning to statistics, trying to determine whether the rest of the year will be a feast like the early 2000s or a famine like last summer. Early indicators find 2005 running even behind last year’s lackluster performance at this point, but industry watchers are quick to point out that many of the summer’s top tours won’t roll out until August or later, when Paul McCartney and the Rolling Stones--among others--hit the road.
Author:
Publish date:

New York (July 5, 2005)--As the calendar page turns to close out the first half of 2005, the concert industry is already anxiously turning to statistics, trying to determine whether the rest of the year will be a feast like the early 2000s or a famine like last summer. Early indicators find 2005 running even behind last year’s lackluster performance at this point, but industry watchers are quick to point out that many of the summer’s top tours won’t roll out until August or later, when Paul McCartney and the Rolling Stones--among others--hit the road.

According to Billboard, the top tour of 2005 so far is U2, whose 26 sold out shows across the U.S. raked in an impressive $45.3 million; the tour is estimated to bring in $300 million by the year’s close after international touring and a follow-up run of the U.S. this fall.

Running close behind is Celine Dion’s Las Vegas show with $38.4 million (Of note: Pro Sound News does not include the show in its Centerstage chart, as the show is not a touring production). Coming in third, Elton John earned $31.2 million across 36 shows.

Filling in the rest of the top 10 are: Kenny Chesney ($25.1 m), The Eagles ($23.3 m), Josh Groban ($16.5 m), Motley Crue ($15.9 m), Cher ($13.7 m), George Strait ($13.5 m) and Yanni ($10.4 m).