Hampton-Adair Music Scores Showtimes iBarbershop/i

Santa Monica, CA (November 3, 2005)--Serving up a musical mix ranging from old school jazz to the latest hip hop beats, award-winning composers Steve "Bone" Hampton and John Adair have wrapped up work on the first season of Barbershop, the Showtime original series about life in a Southside Chicago barbershop. Hampton and Adair wrote the series' main title theme and provided original music for the series. Additionally, they created remixes and provided licensed music for the show.
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Santa Monica, CA (November 3, 2005)--Serving up a musical mix ranging from old school jazz to the latest hip hop beats, award-winning composers Steve "Bone" Hampton and John Adair have wrapped up work on the first season of Barbershop, the Showtime original series about life in a Southside Chicago barbershop. Hampton and Adair wrote the series' main title theme and provided original music for the series. Additionally, they created remixes and provided licensed music for the show.

Created by executive producer John Ridley, Barbershop is based on the popular film series and centers on a barber (Omar Gooding) whose shop serves as a hub for the surrounding African-American neighborhood.

The music for the series is reflective of the colorful diversity of the series' cast, subject matter and situations. "The barbershop is a multi-cultural, multi-generational meeting place, and it's that blending that provides the series with its humor and social relevance," said Brad Hamilton, executive producer of Hampton-Adair Music. "Because the setting for the show is contemporary Chicago, its music has a hip hop backbone, but there are frequent flashbacks and fantasy sequences that take us back to the 70s, the 60s and even farther back, and the music travels along with it."

The time-bending cultural mix is best exemplified by the show's theme music, which Hampton and Adair wrote as part of a competition with other composers. Although the song is firmly rooted in hip-hop, it contains clarinet sprinklings evocative of an earlier era in African-American music. "John played some clarinet lines that recalled the jazz scene that was going on in Chicago in the 1940s," explained Hamilton. "We took those sounds and cut them up so that they fit right in with the hip hop, and it's that fusion that really sums up and captures what the show's all about."

Hampton-Adair Music
www.emotomusic.com