Harry Potter and the Sonically Astonishing DPA Mics - ProSoundNetwork.com

Harry Potter and the Sonically Astonishing DPA Mics

London, U.K. (January 18, 2006)--Released in November to great acclaim, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire features even more amazing technical wizardry than the first three films. During post production, a large number of DPA microphones were used by sound recordists and Foley editors, producing audio effects which contributed hugely to the overall atmosphere and excitement of the film.
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London, U.K. (January 18, 2006)--Released in November to great acclaim, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire features even more amazing technical wizardry than the first three films. During post production, a large number of DPA microphones were used by sound recordists and Foley editors, producing audio effects which contributed hugely to the overall atmosphere and excitement of the film.

British editor and sound recordist Jon Olive worked on crowd noises, including those for the scenes set in a large outdoor stadium during the Quidditch World Cup and Triwizard Tournament. According to Olive, this presented quite a challenge in terms of loop group recording.

Olive, together with supervising sound editor Dennis Leonard and ADR editor Dan Laurie, recorded around 35 professional loop group artists and children from a local school at Bentwaters Park, an ex-US airbase. The 5.0 surround recording was made with five DPA 4011 cardioid mics, each outfitted with DPA's WINDPAC windshield system, on boom stands raised about 12 feet in the air in a semi-circle around the loop group.

"I chose the DPAs for their reliability, lack of coloration and low noise, which was important because so many takes being layered together would have resulted in cumulative noise or coloration," said Olive. "They also stand up well to the kind of abuse they were likely to suffer on any field recording such as this."

Another long-time DPA user, Foley editor Alex Joseph, used a quantity of DPA 4060 and 4062 miniature omnidirectional mics in the studio and on location to record close-up sounds of boats, water and dragon's wings for the film. The sound of the water coming off the boat was recorded using a combination of 4060s above water thickened with agar gel and a DPA Hydrophone in the water. Joseph also experimented with the 4060s for the underwater scene, where he worked closely with Nigel Heath of Hackenbacker post production.

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