Jamiroquais Paul Turner Finds Focus With REDDI

London (February 5, 2007)--It goes without saying that a danceable bass groove is an essential element of Jamiroquai's sound. For the past two years, the task of rendering it for the London-based band has been in the capable hands of Paul Turner, a man who has now joined the roster of bassists endorsing A-Designs Audio's REDDI tube direct injection box.
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London (February 5, 2007)--It goes without saying that a danceable bass groove is an essential element of Jamiroquai's sound. For the past two years, the task of rendering it for the London-based band has been in the capable hands of Paul Turner, a man who has now joined the roster of bassists endorsing A-Designs Audio's REDDI tube direct injection box.
Paul Turner in the studioPrior to joining Jamiroquai, Turner most recently spent two years touring and recording with Annie Lennox, though his impressive recording credentials include the likes of Tina Turner, George Michael, Tom Jones, Belinda Carlisle, Kylie Minogue and many other notable pop/R&B artists.

When looking to invest in a professional DI for his basses, Turner browsed the online forums and asked several engineer friends for their recommendations. The resulting list of serious contenders was a short one and, when compared and contrasted with each other, the REDDI emerged as his DI of choice.

Turner recalls his first experiences with the REDDI: "I did a live radio date with Jamiroquai as well as some TV performances and small gigs during the promo run for the new album and absolutely loved the REDDI. Even the BBC engineer and program producer gave it unprompted glowing reviews after hearing me A/B-ing DIs. My initial impression of it was how focused the bass sounded while remaining fat and warm. It's very versatile with great range--from clean to nicely driven. Jamiroquai's front-of-house engineer liked it as well, in fact he'd already been a fan and owner of another valve DI.

"When we played live on BBC One's Record of the Year, the REDDI again sounded great," Turner said. "I also had a good opportunity to check out how the REDDI's new 'Thru' input sounded going into my amp (an Aguilar DB 750 atop DB 210 and 410 cabinets). After A/B-ing it, I felt that the Thru worked perfectly as an unaffected signal with a level identical that of the bass itself."

In addition to using the REDDI live, Turner also greatly appreciates the bright red DI's stellar sonic qualities in the studio. "I did a session at EMI's writing studios in W1 (West End). When I got out the REDDI, the engineer said, 'Oh you've got one of those.' Transpires they had A/B-ed one against a load of other DIs and found the REDDI to be their favorite. However, they said they couldn't justify the cost, especially when it didn't have a Thru. What they didn't realize was that I had one of the new models that did!

"I had taken the Tube and so arrived only carrying one bass--my white '66 Fender Jazz--and the REDDI. The engineer was as keen as me to see what it could do and we loved it, as did the writer.

"The studio manager came in later to specifically say what a fantastic bass sound it was and he was also very interested to realize that the REDDI, with the newly added Thru, was part of the chain. In fact, we weren't even going to a compressor at the time. The signal path was my bass plugged into the REDDI, going on to a TL Audio valve desk, and listening back on Yamaha NS10Ms, KRKs, and Genelecs. Even though it was a smallish studio, the bass sounded truly awesome. From clean to warm tube, the REDDI is true yet character-full and, man, is it focused! I believe the studio manager has probably reconsidered the REDDI's value!"

A-Designs Audio
www.adesignsaudio.com