Lectrosonics Touchesdown at University Of Phoenix Stadium

Phoenix, AZ (April 3, 2007)--The recently completed University of Phoenix Stadium--home to the NFL's Arizona Cardinals football team--is a fully air conditioned stadium, which encompasses 1.7 million square feet of space, seating capacity of 73,000, and was developed at a cost of approximately $455M. The site also houses an audio/visual system conceived and installed by Miami, FL-based design/build firm Pro Sound. As part of the system alignment process, the Pro Sound team utilized a Lectrosonics TM400 wireless system for test and measurement.
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Phoenix, AZ (April 3, 2007)--The recently completed University of Phoenix Stadium--home to the NFL's Arizona Cardinals football team--is a fully air conditioned stadium, which encompasses 1.7 million square feet of space, seating capacity of 73,000, and was developed at a cost of approximately $455M. The site also houses an audio/visual system conceived and installed by Miami, FL-based design/build firm Pro Sound. As part of the system alignment process, the Pro Sound team utilized a Lectrosonics TM400 wireless system for test and measurement.

Key personnel involved in the University of Phoenix Stadium project included Pro Sound vice president Kelly Prince and Dave Shoemaker, director of Operations, from the company's Orlando, FL satellite office. According to Prince, "Pro Sound handled all audio and broadcast systems at the stadium. This included the audio broadcast control room, hooks for the mobile broadcast trucks, as well as the in-house control room. We purchased the Lectrosonics TM400 specifically for this project--with the big attraction being that the system would enable us to avoid having to run miles of cable in order to take our measurements. Our TM400 was used extensively to measure the new Meyer Sound system that we installed."

Reflecting on the TM400's performance, Prince (who specializes in system alignment) noted, "The TM400 was a tremendous time saver for us, as we avoided having to run all those cables. Initially, I was a bit concerned about the unit's response in contrast to the performance of a wired measurement system, but after several comparisons, we found the TM400 delivered almost identical measurements--with slight differences in some close range results, and miniscule differences in terms of high frequency response."

Shoemaker, who is also a system designer for the firm, was equally enthusiastic about the TM400. "I was particularly impressed by the fact that the TM400 delivered digital performance with its 20 Hz--20 kHz frequency response," said Shoemaker. "This is a big plus. Equally important is the fact that the TM400 has no companding circuitry, as this enables the system to handle the full frequency response of the sound without being compromised by any compression. When you're taking measurements, a compandor would end up compromising the measurement results, which is unacceptable. As a measurement device, you want a wireless system to behave like a hard-wired mic, and the TM400 does exactly that."

Pro Sound
www.prosound.net

Lectrosonics
www.lectrosonics.com