Lemon Squeezes Juice Out of DiGiCo D-TuBe

New York (August 23, 2006)--Eros Ramazzotti recently finished the second leg of his 2006 World Tour, which closed with three nights at Montecarlo's Sporting Club. Sound was mixed for the SRO crowds by Jon Lemon (Oasis, Nine Inch Nails, Beck, The Cure, and Depeche Mode, amongst many others), and on stage by Stevan Martinovic, both of whom manned a DiGiCo D5 Live desk.
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New York (August 23, 2006)--Eros Ramazzotti recently finished the second leg of his 2006 World Tour, which closed with three nights at Montecarlo's Sporting Club. Sound was mixed for the SRO crowds by Jon Lemon (Oasis, Nine Inch Nails, Beck, The Cure, and Depeche Mode, amongst many others), and on stage by Stevan Martinovic, both of whom manned a DiGiCo D5 Live desk.
Jon Lemon at his DiGiCo D5 console on the Eros Ramazzotti tourAudio and lighting were supplied by top Italian rental firm Agorà of L'Aquila. Regarding the choice of an all-digital chain from desks to amp racks, Lemon said, "It really steps the system up considerably. From the point of view of sound, the high end has much better separation and much more definition--it simply sounds much better. I noticed this even more at the indoor sport arena gigs, where there was a lot of reverb floating around and this set-up ensured everything was really a lot more accurate."

Lemon's spec included a DiGiCo D-TuBe, an integrated digital tube mic preamp. "I got one of the first sets of D-TuBes to try out--after which I bought one for myself. It's great when you really want to saturate the input without digital distortion, so you can run things like bass drums, snare drums, bass and guitars a lot harder and consequently fatten them up.

"You can change the sound of the guitars by running them a lot harder on the input side, even into heavy distortion, then you can turn down the digital trim on your input and still have normal gain--it really rounds them out and, with ultra-dynamic things like snare drums, holds it all together really well and makes a great deal of difference. With Ramazzotti's eight-piece band, as well as with the mics at the guitar speakers, I ran direct line inputs from the guitars, which went through the D-TuBe and, by running them a lot harder and fiddling with the delay on the digital side, they became channels with a really different tone but still blended well with the original mic timbre."

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