Liberty Church Gets EV Speakers Woofers - ProSoundNetwork.com

Liberty Church Gets EV Speakers Woofers

Dallas, TX (March 2, 2004)--Liberty Christian Church in Havelock, NC is a sizable facility, sporting a 500-seat sanctuary that is designed to avoid the cavernous look of some other non-denominational churches. When the Church needed a full package of sound reinforcement, acoustic treatment, video and lighting, it turned to Dallas-based A/V installation specialist Sight N Sound Communications (SNSC), who outfitted Liberty with Electro-Voice boxes and subwoofers, among other gear.
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Dallas, TX (March 2, 2004)--Liberty Christian Church in Havelock, NC is a sizable facility, sporting a 500-seat sanctuary that is designed to avoid the cavernous look of some other non-denominational churches. When the Church needed a full package of sound reinforcement, acoustic treatment, video and lighting, it turned to Dallas-based A/V installation specialist Sight N Sound Communications (SNSC), who outfitted Liberty with Electro-Voice boxes and subwoofers, among other gear.

SNSC estimates that around 85 percent of its work takes place in houses of worship, with most of that business running on referrals from across the country. SNSC typically utilizes a variety of different EV loudspeakers for these projects; in the case of Liberty Christian Church, there was a lot of equipment brought to bear during the two-week, full A/V installation last August.

SNSC's Danny Snook explained that the installation came with some guidelines, noting "The church wanted to bypass the cost of an EASE model. This worked out fine, as the room was of a conventional material, shape and size--familiar territory. A standard LCR hang was the obvious choice, albeit in an exploded cluster configuration that would meet (EASE modeling specialist) Bob Coffeen's standards. In fact, I attended the EASE factory training sessions when Telex first took over EV a few years back. Learning about arrays and exploding, rather than tight packing, clusters has been invaluable in what we do, whether or not we make an EASE model for any particular project. Since then I've exploded every cluster I've installed, all with great success."

For the Liberty installation, a trio of EV 15-inch FRi+ 152/64 boxes cover the sanctuary, flown 16 feet apart over the stage. The center cabinet is an inverted 15-inch FRi+ 152/64, with the horn firing down. Another DH7 with a 6040 horn sits atop it, pointed straight at the sound engineers on the mezzanine. Snook reported that the two pieces couple well, adding, "we've got full coverage all the way up from the floor to the mezzanine. I have the auxiliary horn dialed back, so I'm not hearing any interference between them. The dispersion is really precise, really focused."

Broadening the sound quality in the church are a pair of QRx 118S subwoofers, placed on their sides in pockets built into the underside of the stage, each with an EVID 6.2 sitting in front as fills for the front rows. The QRx subs were fortunately low-profile enough to integrate into the stage structure, hidden behind acoustically transparent grilles that match the house carpet.

Finally, monitoring duties are handled by FRi-28LPMs used as pulpit monitors, and two Eliminator Monitor E wedges for the choir. The church's pastor and the worship leader are both using the EV NRSCU wireless system with beltpacks.

After the extensive installation was completed, Snook returned to the church a month later to tweak the system with a full congregation in the seats, thus handling the final details for the church. It was the culmination of a carefully planned project. "We worked with the architects right from the beginning to ensure a complete system design, including video and lighting," said Snook. "We even changed the ceiling line of the room to make it more acoustically friendly. They did a lot of nice things with the room: it's a community church, but it's no 'non-denominational warehouse.' Liberty Christian Church has a lot of tasteful design nuances such as chandeliers and rich colors, and the sound system really complements these elements in being both aesthetically discrete and sonically superb."

Sight N Sound Communications
www.snsc.net

Telex Communications, Inc.
www.telex.com