Los Angeles Guitar Quartet Turns To Neumann KM 184 - ProSoundNetwork.com

Los Angeles Guitar Quartet Turns To Neumann KM 184

Los Angeles (February 16, 2006)--The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet (LAGQ) plays delicate classical music, but when it hits the road, it needs mics made of sterner stuff. On its current spring tour, the act is using Neumann KM 184 microphones.
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Los Angeles (February 16, 2006)--The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet (LAGQ) plays delicate classical music, but when it hits the road, it needs mics made of sterner stuff. On its current spring tour, the act is using Neumann KM 184 microphones.

With a new album coming out in the spring of 2006 to follow up on the success of 2004's Guitar Heroes, LAGQ is hitting the road with four compact Neumann KM 184 cardioid microphones on hand. "The KM 184s have really worked well for us," LAGQ member, William Kanengiser reports. "We tour a lot, and we've found that they're really portable and really durable. The sound engineers at the venue always have a big smile on their face when they see our mics. They usually just set the EQ flat and it sounds great."

"The guitar is a notoriously difficult instrument to mic," said Kanengiser. "It's very quiet, and the sound source on a classical guitar is pretty small. On top of that, guitars are unbalanced in terms of their frequency response. They have wolf tones in the low range, spikes in the middle, the body itself has its own resonant frequency, and you've got to deal with the squawk factor on the strings that can create an unwanted upper-high-end sound.

"We had a lot of problems in the past when we didn't have the right mics in front of our guitars, but the KM 184 evens things out. It's a no-brainer for us. We have the spot. We place the mics. And even with different halls, sound setups and engineers, these mics work extremely smoothly. There's a richness of the wood from a nylon string guitar that is hard to capture and the wrong mic will make it sound plastic and flat, but with the Neumann we get the depth and that intangible thing called the 'natural sound.' The result is what we think of as 'stealth amplification,' where people aren't even aware that sound reinforcement is taking place. They just hear the full picture of what we're doing."

Neumann USA
www.neumannusa.com