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Magic Shop Installs Rupert Neve 5088 Console - ProSoundNetwork.com

Magic Shop Installs Rupert Neve 5088 Console

New York, NY (December 8, 2009)--New York's The Magic Shop has installed a Rupert Neve Designs 5088 discrete analog mixing console in its newly reconfigured and re-purposed Blue Room.
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Photo caption: (l-r) Josh Thomas,
Rupert Neve Designs; Steve Rosenthal,
Magic Shop; Rupert Neve;
Warren Russell-Smith, Magic Shop,
with the new Rupert Neve Designs 5088
analog console in Magic Shop's Blue Room.New York, NY (December 8, 2009)--New York's The Magic Shop has installed a Rupert Neve Designs 5088 discrete analog mixing console in its newly reconfigured and re-purposed Blue Room.

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According to studio owner Steve Rosenthal, a multi-Grammy-winning engineer and producer who established the studio in Manhattan's Soho neighborhood in 1988, the Rupert Neve Designs 5088 console in the Blue Room is intended to impart analog character to DAW projects. "It's really a pretty simple concept," he explains. "The idea is to offer a low-cost alternative for my clients who are forced sometimes to mix in the box."

The audio restoration equipment formerly housed in the Blue Room has been moved down the hall to the Red Room. The facility also features a custom vintage Neve series 80 console in Studio A, notable as the venue for such album projects as Coldplay's Viva La Vida and Norah Jones' latest release, The Fall.

Magic Shop's new 5088 offers 32 inputs with 16 faders and is additionally configured with a variety of Portico modules positioned in the console's penthouse section. They include eight 5032 mic pre/eqs, eight 5033 five-band EQs, a pair of 5043 dual-channel compressor/limiters, a 5014 Stereo Field Editor and a 5042 "True Tape" emulation module. "It's a nice collection of EQs, mic pres and compressors for people to try out," comments Rosenthal.

He continues, "The other thing that I'd like it to be used for--and hope that it will be used for--is for re-stemming mixes. What happens a lot of times now is that bands come in and spend time and money upstairs in the main Neve room mixing their record. Then, subsequently, there are fixes that either the artist or the record company is interested in doing. This gives them an opportunity to take the stems and run them back through the 5088, through the Class A signal path and the great compressors that are in it."

Rupert Neve Designs
www.rupertneve.com