Meyer Sound Debuts MVC-5 Graduated Vertical Coverage Loudspeaker

Berkeley, CA (March 1, 2005)--Meyer Sound has announced the release of the MVC-5 graduated vertical coverage loudspeaker, a self-powered, multiple-element, curvilinear array with fixed splay angles, housed in a single compact enclosure. The system is designed for voice reproduction in large spaces with single-level listening areas at minimal or gradual elevations.
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Berkeley, CA (March 1, 2005)--Meyer Sound has announced the release of the MVC-5 graduated vertical coverage loudspeaker, a self-powered, multiple-element, curvilinear array with fixed splay angles, housed in a single compact enclosure. The system is designed for voice reproduction in large spaces with single-level listening areas at minimal or gradual elevations.

Though primarily intended for voice, Meyer reports that the MVC-5 is also capable of reproducing recorded music and sound for audio-visual presentations in the context of meetings, corporate and other events, or in houses of worship. The company also suggests that multiple MVC-5 cabinets may be applicable in distributed systems for airports and other transportation hubs, above industrial/manufacturing floors, convention and trade-show venues, theme parks, hangars, city-walks and promenades, and other large, open areas where the loudspeakers can be distributed and suspended.

The MVC-5 loudspeaker is functionally similar to a line array consisting of five M1D ultra-compact curvilinear array loudspeakers with splay angles designed for moderately high SPL and controlled graduated vertical coverage. For applications where coverage needs are compatible with the MVC-5, Meyer claims the design "results in a very flat response and even coverage, from a single unit in a smaller space or multiple units in a distributed system."

When suspended in a venue, the MVC-5 loudspeaker reportedly achieves levels useful for speech reinforcement (approximately 90db peak on axis) at distances up to 300 feet. By distributing and properly delaying enclosures approximately 100 to 200 feet from each other in the on-axis orientation, the system is said to provide "smooth, even coverage" throughout a large single-level listening area. The MVC-5 is designed for suspension only.

The MVC-5's horizontal coverage angle is 100 degrees. The graduated stepped vertical coverage can produce similar sound pressure levels and frequency response at both longer distances on axis to the upper portion of the enclosure and shorter distances below and closer to the loudspeaker. Overall vertical coverage extends downward approximately 50 degrees below direct on-axis positioning.

According to Meyer, spacing and electronic control of all components enables the MVC-5 to provide consistent full-range coverage, and controlled directionality above 300 Hz. Electronic control of the drivers operating in their linear range reportedly yields flat phase and frequency responses throughout the unit's operating frequency range of 60 Hz to 18 kHz.

The low- and mid-frequency section of the MVC-5 consists of 10 five-inch cone drivers arranged in a two by five configuration. At lower frequencies, all drivers combine to reproduce coherent bass response. In the mid frequencies, the crossover feeds the signal to only the five drivers adjacent to the high-frequency horns, in an effort to eliminate interference between the cone drivers while maintaining polar and frequency response characteristics at the crossover with the high frequency drivers.

The high-frequency section consists of 15 vertically aligned 0.75-inch dome drivers installed in five constant-directivity horns with a 100 degree horizontal coverage. The aligned set of high-frequency drivers functions as a line array, focusing the sound into an graduated controlled vertical coverage pattern to cover single-level listening areas.

The MVC-5 is designed for single-enclosure suspension and features four ring and stud fittings on top, plus a single fitting on the bottom to adjust the pull-up angle. Meyer stated that "the tightly sealed enclosure, special adhesives and paint, multi-layer grille, and other dust- and weather-resistant appointments form a distributed, self-powered loudspeaker system that will maintain its reliability and performance for many years under continual use."

Meyer Sound Labs
www.meyersound.com