Meyer Turns Diana Ross Upside Down

New York (February 9, 2007)--Motorola's European division recently held a special event for several hundred VIP clients at Villa San Martino on the island of Elba, off the coast of Italy, best known as Napoleon's "summer residence" during his exile from France nearly 200 years ago. Live entertainment for the event was provided by legendary pop diva Diana Ross, who was heard through Meyer Sound M'elodie compact curvilinear array loudspeakers.
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New York (February 9, 2007)--Motorola's European division recently held a special event for several hundred VIP clients at Villa San Martino on the island of Elba, off the coast of Italy, best known as Napoleon's "summer residence" during his exile from France nearly 200 years ago. Live entertainment for the event was provided by legendary pop diva Diana Ross, who was heard through Meyer Sound M'elodie compact curvilinear array loudspeakers.
Diana Ross wowed the crowd at Motorola's special event on the Isle of Elba, being heard through a Meyer M'elodie line array system.Sound reinforcement design was provided by Chris Marsh, Ross's FOH engineer and a close associate of Wiltshire, UK-based sound hire company Major Tom Ltd. "The brief called for a compact and lightweight full-range system," Marsh says. "The producers wanted a big, exciting show but without bulky production elements. M'elodie arrays fit the bill perfectly." Major Tom Ltd. supplied all audio equipment for the three nights of shows, with systems tech Paul Johnson keeping all gear in working order.

The stage for Ross and her 10-piece backing band was erected on a broad, shallow terrace behind the villa. (A cutout in the stage accommodated a sapling that had supposedly sprung from roots of "Napoleon's tree.") Two M'elodie arrays of eight cabinets each covered the wide audience area directly in front of the stage, while two UPA-1P compact wide coverage loudspeakers at center stage took care of a few front tables and pulled the image down. Additional pairs of UPA-1P cabinets at each end covered tables wrapped around the side, four 600-HP compact high-power subwoofers anchored the bottom end of the sound, and Meyer Sound's new MJF-212 stage monitors provided foldback to Ross and her band. A Galileo loudspeaker management system handled all system drive processing.

"Galileo's atmospheric correction was a true lifesaver," testifies Marsh. "The temperature dropped from a high of 35 to 40 degrees (centigrade) in the afternoon to below 20 at night, and humidity would vary from 40 to 85 percent. But with the Galileo, we took it all in stride."

Meyer Sound
www.meyersound.com