Mixing Workshop Opens at Big Shot Studios

Altamonte Springs, FL (September 4, 2007)--The Mixing Workshop has opened its studio doors to train engineers in the specific mixing techniques used on hit records and tours. The program is conducted at Big Shot Studios (formerly PARC Studios).
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Altamonte Springs, FL (September 4, 2007)--The Mixing Workshop has opened its studio doors to train engineers in the specific mixing techniques used on hit records and tours. The program is conducted at Big Shot Studios (formerly PARC Studios).

With the proliferation of home and personal studios and disappearance of the studio apprenticeships of the past, audio training schools have combined classrooms and training studios with internships in real studios to provide instruction in recording and mixing techniques and technology.

“Few top-shelf recording studios let people sit in on mixes and learn the tricks of the trade for making records and mixing,” says workshop founder and Big Shot Studios chief engineer Sean Shannon. "Mixing is not easy, and it is so important. We see the need for ear training and mixing training every time we go to a venue and hear poor house sound, or listen to the amateur demos that come to [Big Shot Records]. Nowadays, anyone can buy a computer and some software, and call himself or herself an engineer the next day. It just doesn't work that way in the real world--it takes time in the seat.”

The Mixing Workshop is an immersive, hands-on learning experience where trainees are in the studio mixing on real equipment from the start. This equipment includes a Solid State Logic 6056 console housed in a studio designed by the Walters-Storyk Design Group. The focus is on the individual, with private, individual mixing sessions, daily ear training drills with Dave Moulton's Golden Ears audio ear training system, and mix sessions with professional engineers.

The monthly workshop runs eight hours per day for three weeks. Trainees spend time every day learning to hear and control frequencies, compressors, effects, distortion, levels, and other aspects of audio, and then they apply those techniques in the studio.

“People learn by doing, and they remember what they do with their hands,” says Shannon. "You can read about mixing, but it just isn't the same thing. Imagine walking into a multi-million dollar studio complex, mixing real sessions in all of the studios with an experienced engineer as a mentor, soaking up what took years for him to learn, and leaving with your mixes, so you can sell your talents and find a job in the audio industry.”

The Mixing Workshop
www.themixingworkshop.com