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MOSR Seeks New Home - ProSoundNetwork.com

MOSR Seeks New Home

Richmond Hill, NY (January 13, 2004)--For the past 12 years, the Museum of Sound Recording (MOSR) has been collecting the world's artifacts of the recording industry, instituting a mission of celebrating sound through heritage preservation, education and entertainment. Having fairly recently found a home for its exhibit, training, and recording facilities in 2002, moving into RKO Keith's Vaudeville Theater in Queens, New York, it now seems that due to lack of funding, MOSR will be forced to exit with the expiration of its lease.
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Richmond Hill, NY (January 13, 2004)--For the past 12 years, the Museum of Sound Recording (MOSR) has been collecting the world's artifacts of the recording industry, instituting a mission of celebrating sound through heritage preservation, education and entertainment. Having fairly recently found a home for its exhibit, training, and recording facilities in 2002, moving into RKO Keith's Vaudeville Theater in Queens, New York, it now seems that due to lack of funding, MOSR will be forced to exit with the expiration of its lease.

Just last year, MOSR renovated the grand mezzanine of RKO Keith in authentic original style, installed a working exhibit, and got interns from regional audio schools involved-to help maintain and learn about the historical equipment, as well as to record.

"Our lease has expired, and we have to move out by March 2004, and though we're extremely grateful to the owners of the building, the Museum needs a secure and permanent home, which it has never had," implored MOSR president Daniel Gaydos. "The Museum needs emergency help in order to emerge from constant struggle. Each struggle represents another effort halted. The Museum has a business plan, 501(c)(3) status, many educational syllabi, talented volunteer staff, two facilities completely pre-designed with every imaginable exhibition and educational component, but no money. Funding will put everything into action."

Gaydos hopes that MOSR will attract funding from the very industry it honors. With proper funding, MOSR's extensive collection of historic recording equipment will be kept alive for demonstration and actual production, and the museum itself developed as a source of education and entertainment. "By keeping the artifacts hands-on, we are giving the participants vehicles to create legends of their own," said Gaydos. "Education is geared toward those who would otherwise not have access to recording and media career opportunities."

In seeking a new home, MOSR hopes for help from Queens political and community leaders, who are currently attempting to identify and secure a permanent home in Queens for the museum. Gaydos points out that the Museum has been designed so that it can be developed in any city to honor its own regional recording heritage.

"The Museum also attunes its resources toward its cultural endeavors and career opportunities for its youth," noted Gaydos. "We have created programs and exhibits extensive enough to adapt to any use, and these endeavors are not supported by studio production fees, studio rentals or manufacturing. It can only come from the support of those whom it supports."

Museum of Sound Recording
www.museumofsoundrecording.org