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Music Pirate Sales Hit Record 11 Billion Discs - ProSoundNetwork.com

Music Pirate Sales Hit Record 11 Billion Discs

London, U.K. (July 26, 2004)--Global sales of pirate music have hit another record at 1.1 billion discs annually, but thanks to stepped up enforcement efforts the fake CD trade is spreading more slowly than in recent years. Music piracy remains a huge $4.5 billion illegal business driven by organized crime, government apathy and corruption.
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London, U.K. (July 26, 2004)--Global sales of pirate music have hit another record at 1.1 billion discs annually, but thanks to stepped up enforcement efforts the fake CD trade is spreading more slowly than in recent years. Music piracy remains a huge $4.5 billion illegal business driven by organized crime, government apathy and corruption.

These are the highlights of the new Commercial Piracy Report 2004 published by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) on behalf of more than 1,400 hundred record companies worldwide. The report singles out 10 priority countries--four in Asia, three in Latin America and three in Europe--where wholesale anti-piracy offensives are most urgently needed.

According to the report, global sales of illegal music discs rose four percent in 2003 and the global average piracy rate increased to a record 35 percent. The ratio of illegal to legal CDs sold continues to increase: in 2000, one in five CDs sold worldwide was a pirate copy; in 2003 the ratio was one in three, and rising.

Encouragingly, music disc piracy in 2003 grew at its slowest rate in four years, indicating that enforcement efforts by industry anti-piracy teams, and by some government enforcement agencies, are now having a significant impact. There were record levels of seizures of discs and of CD copying equipment.

The report makes a four-point "Call to Governments" asking for strong and up to date copyright laws, proper deterrent sentencing of pirates, regulation of disc manufacturing, and commitment to prosecute copyright crime aggressively.

"The responsibility now is for governments--and especially on the 10 priority countries our report names--to act decisively against the problem," stated IFPI chairman and CEO Jay Berman. The IFPI represents the recording industry in over 70 countries and affiliated industry associations in 48 countries.

International Federation of the Phonographic Industry
www.ifpi.org