NARM Board Issues Digital Rights Management Statement - ProSoundNetwork.com

NARM Board Issues Digital Rights Management Statement

Marlton, NJ (August 1, 2006)--The board of directors of the National Association of Recording Merchandisers (NARM), a trade group whose core members include music and entertainment retailers and wholesalers, is urging the adoption of compatible DRM systems and standards to administer intellectual property rights, combat piracy and ensure interoperability.
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Marlton, NJ (August 1, 2006)--The board of directors of the National Association of Recording Merchandisers (NARM), a trade group whose core members include music and entertainment retailers and wholesalers, is urging the adoption of compatible DRM systems and standards to administer intellectual property rights, combat piracy and ensure interoperability.

The statement reads in part: "If DRM compatibility cannot be achieved, we urge the content and hardware communities to actively investigate innovative new alternatives to current DRM. Retailers want to have a meaningful dialogue with the entertainment and technology industries on this issue and are committed to working together to seek creative ideas and reasonable solutions that will ultimately benefit everyone involved, most importantly consumers.

"The Board strongly supports the development of new business models that will offer consumers legal, user-friendly access to a wide array of digital music and other forms of entertainment with the best shopping, listening and viewing experiences possible. While necessary, Digital Rights Management (DRM) systems and standards should not compromise these experiences and erode the very consumer confidence that is essential to achieving the full potential of digital delivery.

"If consumers are discouraged by compatibility constraints and conflicts, we fear they will be less inclined to purchase more music and other digital entertainment content, and may instead choose illegal options. Efforts to grow the legal digital marketplace will be derailed if the entertainment and technology industries do nothing to eliminate the confusion, frustration and disillusionment consumers encounter when they cannot seamlessly enjoy their entertainment on a variety of systems, services or devices.

"As long as there are incompatible DRM systems and standards, it will be difficult to satisfy consumer expectations. Retailers will also be hampered from effectively performing their unique and valued role to help advance digital delivery, and successfully competing to deliver digital entertainment in compelling ways that consumers desire."

National Association of Recording Merchandisers
www.narm.com