New Process Captures Piano Recordings - ProSoundNetwork.com

New Process Captures Piano Recordings

Raleigh, N.C. (May 11, 2005)--Zenph Studios, Inc. has developed a new process that, captures audio piano recordings--even old or poor-quality ones--and converts them into high-definition descriptions of the original performances that can be exactingly replicated using modern piano technology. This process literally captures the pianist's original performance intentions, placing the listener back at the moment of creation and recreating a performance that may previously have been obscured by the limitations of the original recording
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Raleigh, N.C. (May 11, 2005)--Zenph Studios, Inc. has developed a new process that, captures audio piano recordings--even old or poor-quality ones--and converts them into high-definition descriptions of the original performances that can be exactingly replicated using modern piano technology. This process literally captures the pianist's original performance intentions, placing the listener back at the moment of creation and recreating a performance that may previously have been obscured by the limitations of the original recording.

Now, for example, piano recordings made in mono can be recreated in surround sound or stereo. Generations of historical recordings can be revitalized, changing them from artifacts to fresh new releases. Old recordings made on outdated sound equipment, or played on out-of-tune instruments, can yield modern, high-quality CDs of the same performances. Zenph can even convert a chance recording of a jazz artist's off-the-cuff improvisation into a precise description that can be re-performed, re-recorded, or printed as sheet music.

This month, the company will demonstrate the new technology with a concert at the BTI Center for the Performing Arts in Raleigh, N.C. Those in attendance will experience "live" recreations of French pianist Alfred Cortot (1877-1962) playing a Chopin Prelude from 1926 and Canadian pianist Glenn Gould (1932-1982) performing excerpts from Bach's Goldberg Variations as recorded in 1955. Zenph has also used this process to capture a recording made by Art Tatum two years before his death in 1956.

Zenph's software analysis determines the precise keystrokes, pedal movement and timing that went into a performance. "Our process is a leap beyond the recording to the original performance itself," said Zenph president John Q. Walker. "The process even snares the individual notes within dense harmonies, so each can be reproduced with their individual shades of touch and dynamics."

Zenph Studios, Inc.
www.zenph.com