Northbrook Changes With Times amp Danley Loudspeakers - ProSoundNetwork.com

Northbrook Changes With Times amp Danley Loudspeakers

New York (January 29, 2007)--Northbrook United Methodist Church in Roswell, GA has been around for some time and typically always provided a traditional service. When the church changed to a more blended format that also provided contemporary music in services, the decision was to upgrade the audio system with the help of Ronnie Stanford, systems advisor for dB Audio and Video (Gainesville, GA). He, in turn, turned to Danley Sound Labs loudspeakers to tackle the job.
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New York (January 29, 2007)--Northbrook United Methodist Church in Roswell, GA has been around for some time and typically always provided a traditional service. When the church changed to a more blended format that also provided contemporary music in services, the decision was to upgrade the audio system with the help of Ronnie Stanford, systems advisor for dB Audio and Video (Gainesville, GA). He, in turn, turned to Danley Sound Labs loudspeakers to tackle the job.
A Danley loudspeaker center cluster handles 90% of the sound reinforcement for the Northbrook United Methodist Church.Northbrook seats 700 in a large, rectangular room with sixty-foot ceilings. The front of the balcony is seventy feet from the front wall, and the balcony itself is another fifty feet deep. The seating is arrayed in a semicircle focused on the stage. "From an audio perspective, you have to keep your speakers in front of the pulpit, and yet you need to cover a lot of seats that are actually behind the pulpit," explained Stanford. "In addition, part of the seating is underneath 'wings' that are twelve feet from either side of the pulpit. Under the wings, the ceilings are a mere eight feet. So your main speakers are hanging off of sixty-foot ceilings, and yet you still have to reach underneath these wings!"

Stanford brought a pair of Danley Sound Labs SH-50s full-range speakers and a single Danley TH-115 subwoofer for a demo. "We weren't trying to pin anyone against the back wall with bass," he joked, "but we did want a nice, rich low-end response. We flew the three SH-50 speakers above the pulpit with an additional SH-100 as downfill. Now the church heard the sound they wanted to hear with the Danley speakers. The nice, high ceilings eliminated the need for other downfills."

With the help of their dB Audio and Video engineer Ivan Beaver, Stanford tackled the wings with a pair of Atlas SM82 full-range wall-mount speakers. "We placed the Atlases at the crown of the wall and ran them on delays," he explained. "We had to be careful not to create problems in the main seating area, by making sure they were properly timed and then we kept the volume low."

Stanford rounded out Northbrook's audio makeover with acoustic treatment against the long, flat back wall. Noted Stanford, "I just knew with the long throw from that height that we were going to energize that back wall in a way that the older sound system was incapable of doing. So, without adding some acoustical treatment, the reflections would have been harsh."

dB Audio and Video also added a 16-channel Yamaha AW16G digital recorder so that they could preserve and reproduce performances by their growing cast of musicians.

Danley Sound Labs
www.danleysoundlabs.com