Orban Releases First MPEG-4 aacPlus Streaming Audio Encoder

Tempe, AZ (January 21, 2004)--Orban has announced the immediate availability of Opticodec-PC, the first MPEG-4 aacPlus encoding software providing high quality streaming audio. The software lets streaming providers supply content encoded with the Coding Technologies aacPlus codec, widely acknowledged as offering the highest available audio quality at the lowest possible bit rate.
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Tempe, AZ (January 21, 2004)--Orban has announced the immediate availability of Opticodec-PC, the first MPEG-4 aacPlus encoding software providing high quality streaming audio. The software lets streaming providers supply content encoded with the Coding Technologies aacPlus codec, widely acknowledged as offering the highest available audio quality at the lowest possible bit rate.

"Streaming has just become profitable," said Rusty Hodge of SomaFM after first hearing the aacPlus codec at 32 kbps. Broadcast streams encoded with Opticodec-PC can be experienced through the new RealPlayer 10 and can automatically list themselves on www.opticodec.net, an upcoming new directory service for Opticodec-PC streams.

Opticodec-PC is available for Microsoft Windows 2000/XP and supplies streams compatible with the free Darwin Streaming Server, which is for available multiple platforms including Linux, Windows, and Macintosh. Opticodec-PC is available in two versions, LE and PE. Opticodec-PC LE is compatible with all quality sound cards and encodes a single stream at bit rates between 8 and 32 kbps. Opticodec-PC PE is offered solely in a premium package coupled with an Optimod-PC and can encode multiple simultaneous streams at bit rates from 8 to 320 kbps. Both products are available immediately to beta customers. Opticodec-PC LE retails for $99.

Compared to MP3, Opticodec-PC provides a better than 60 percent improvement in audio quality versus bit rate, reducing network streaming bandwidth requirements and costs accordingly. At 32 kbps, Opticodec-PC streams offer close to FM quality, without the phasey, watery character of older codecs operating at this bit rate. According to the company, many listeners will prefer a 48 kbps stream to FM radio.

Orban/CRL Systems
www.orban.com

Coding Technologies, Inc.
www.codingtechnologies.com