PampE-Wing-Demystifies-Vinyl

Santa Monica, CA (April 29, 2011)--The Recording Academy Memphis Chapter recently hosted a discussion and critical listening session on the art of recording for vinyl.
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John Fry and Jeff Powell demonstrate L. Nix Mastering's lacquer disc cutting lathe.
Santa Monica, CA (April 29, 2011)--The Recording Academy Memphis Chapter recently hosted a discussion and critical listening session on the art of recording for vinyl.

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Moderated by Memphis-based engineer/producer and vinyl cutter Jeff Powell, the panel consisted of president/CEO of Furnace MFG (Furnace Record Pressing, Pallas USA, Record Industry USA), Eric Astor; producer/engineer and founder of Ardent Studios, John Fry; Masterdisk NYC mastering engineer and vinyl cutter, Scott Hull; and mastering engineer/vinyl cutter Larry Nix. Presenting sponsors of the event included Ardent Studios, GC Pro and Record Store Day.

The act of getting a master recording to a vinyl disc is a delicate and complicated process that few today are familiar with. This Grammy GPS event, held on Saturday, April 16, 2011, utilized the experience and expertise of its panelists to demystify the process--from how to optimize mixing and mastering for this classic format, to the challenges of cutting the all-important lacquer discs that must be delivered to a vinyl pressing plant, to tips and tricks on how to work with disc manufacturers.

"There are only a few people these days who really understand how to create great vinyl records," said Maureen Droney, Producers & Engineers Wing sr. executive director. "We were extremely excited to be able to assemble this knowledgeable group, which encompasses some of the best in the business. Their combined skill and experience generated a great discussion and an insightful listening session--and their obvious passion for the vinyl art form was totally infectious. All in all, it was a terrific way to celebrate Record Store Day."

Eric Astor offered invaluable hints about how to work with manufacturers to keep quality up and costs down, and, although he shared a wealth of technical knowledge he also allowed, "After 25 years, I still have to say it is a magical and amazing process."

The Recording Academy
www.grammy.com