Pop Sound Keeps it Simple for Ikea

Santa Monica, CA (November 10, 2005)--POP Sound's Peter Rincon prepared a minimalist sound design to support the deadpan humor of three new spots for Ikea. Rincon also prepared the final mix for the spots, conceived by Santa Monica agency Secret Weapon Marketing, which show some of the unusual things people are driven to do in homes filled with Ikea furniture.
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Santa Monica, CA (November 10, 2005)--POP Sound's Peter Rincon prepared a minimalist sound design to support the deadpan humor of three new spots for Ikea. Rincon also prepared the final mix for the spots, conceived by Santa Monica agency Secret Weapon Marketing, which show some of the unusual things people are driven to do in homes filled with Ikea furniture.

Leo has a teenager eating cheese curls while lounging on a fluffy, white Ikea sofa. The sofa is so nice that, rather than wipe his sticky, orange fingers on the cushions as he might otherwise do, the boy calls the family's fluffy, white dog and uses it as a napkin.

The soundtrack for the commercial is spare; the boy speaks only to call his pet and to offer him an encouraging "Good dog" at the end. "The sound emanating from the television set-a nature show-is very subdued," recalled Rincon. "The music, too, is bare bones and we didn't want to draw too much attention to it."

Despite its subtlety, the sound work in the spot is actually quite complex. "There is a lot of sound in the spots," Rincon observed. He noted that a second spot in the package, Sick, about a man who calls in sick in order to spend the day with his wife in his comfy Ikea-furnished bedroom, is sprinkled with barely audible sound elements that help to set the scene and tell the story. "We added a lot of complexity, while maintaining its feel of being minimal," Rincon noted.

The third spot, Manager, has the manager of a Chicago-area Ikea store describing the grand opening of another Ikea nearby, and noting how it may leave him feeling lonely. All three spots end with an up-tempo theme. "The transition to the music had to be done just right," said Rincon. "After 20-seconds of minimalist storytelling, it couldn't come in too fat or heavy. You just want the melody and the groove."

POP Sound
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