Prayer Palaces Audio Prayers Are Answered

Toronto, Ontario (February 20, 2004)--The Prayer Palace is one of the largest houses of worship in North America, with an octagonal-shaped sanctuary encompassing approximately 38,000 square feet. The Prayer Palace Ministries hold two regular Sunday masses in the space, which doubles as a sanctuary and a 4,500-seat auditorium capable of hosting a variety of other secular and ethnic events. Concord, Ontario-based Sound Plus Show Systems recently completed a new audio installation at the church, which included a line array from Adamson with SpekTrix enclosures.
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Toronto, Ontario (February 20, 2004)--The Prayer Palace is one of the largest houses of worship in North America, with an octagonal-shaped sanctuary encompassing approximately 38,000 square feet. The Prayer Palace Ministries hold two regular Sunday masses in the space, which doubles as a sanctuary and a 4,500-seat auditorium capable of hosting a variety of other secular and ethnic events. Concord, Ontario-based Sound Plus Show Systems recently completed a new audio installation at the church, which included a line array from Adamson with SpekTrix enclosures.

Sound Plus was approached by Pastor Tom Melnichuk, executive producer director of the Prayer Palace, with the task of addressing problems with the sound system in the sanctuary. "Complaints from Sunday mass attendees were a weekly occurrence," said Sound Plus technical services director Chris Mathany. According to Melnichuk, the loudspeaker system that was initially installed "was not projecting with clarity--in spite of many relocations and additional EQs. Therefore, the 'message' of spoken word and music became a transmission of incoherency. To me, it seemed almost impossible to get this auditorium to sound anywhere near acceptable."

"The existing system was beautifully installed," explained Mathany. "The problem seemed to be with poor design using many clusters of traditional trapezoidal cabinets. The addition of clusters was only serving to muddy the direct sound in certain areas and create hot spots in others. The sound at the FOH mix position was completely unintelligible and quiet, yet a 10 foot jaunt to the center aisle made it loud and crispy. My assessment was that dropping and re-hanging the entire system would be less expensive, but far less effective than bringing in a line array system that would actually fix the problem."

Sound Plus' answer was to spec a new Adamson Yaxis Y10 line array, comprised of 16 Y10 cabinets and four SpekTrix enclosures used as a center cluster. The installer priced both options and presented them to the facility, but after seeing only 16 Y10 loudspeakers specified to provide coverage for the area, Melnichuk admits he was sceptical. "I'll not forget the day when Rocky Nufrio from Sound Plus said, 'I'll make a believer out of you yet!'. I said it was not possible--I had a much larger number of speakers of a well-known, high-end brand installed in several clusters throughout the sanctuary." But after Sound Plus brought in a full-faceted demo system and let the facility hear the difference and make the decision themselves, the ministry opted to go with the line array.

Located on each side of the huge proscenium are eight Adamson Yaxis Y10s. The main L/R clusters are spaced roughly 150 feet apart, and tilted slightly inward to account for the room's odd octagonal shape. The mains are controlled by the XTA DP226 (2 in, 6 out) for stereo Y10 configuration. The main L/R arrays are powered by QSC amplifiers--eight QSC Powerlight 4.0s for the lows, four QSC 3402s for the mids and another four 3402s for highs. Mathany said that his client is planning to replace the church's existing subs with Adamson Y10 Subs later this year.

Due to the large distance between the main arrays, which was crucial to maintaining lines of sight, four SpekTrix boxes were flown dead center and at an extreme downward angle to provide required front fill. Processing for the central cluster is managed by the XTA 224 (mono source, four outs), with QSC 2402 and 1602 amplifiers providing power for the array. Mathany noted that with the exception of the QSC Powerlight 4.0 amps, all power used for the re-fit was adopted from what the client had purchased for the previous installation. Additionally, Adamson's managing director Jesse Adamson, helped with the installation, using Adamson Shooter software to help design the system and ensure audience coverage.

Mathany said the client is pleased with the results. "I have been working closely with the Prayer Palace production staff to ensure the smooth integration of the system into their regular routine. Very little has needed to be done, and the staff seems to love the new system." Melnichuk confirmed that, noting, "People that continually complained about our former audio system are now congratulating us."

Adamson Systems Engineering
www.adamsonproaudio.com