Putting the EV in Devo - ProSoundNetwork.com

Putting the EV in Devo

New York (October 24, 2006)--New Wave, post-modern, early electronica, synth punk...call it what you will, but the music of Devo remains as odd and endearing as it was 25 years ago when the band broke through with "Whip It." While the tunes and musicians may be a bit older, the group always was driven by technology though, so it's not too surprisingly that the band is keeping up with the latest gear--an effort that has now seen its addition to Electro-Voice's artist endorsement program.
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New York (October 24, 2006)--New Wave, post-modern, early electronica, synth punk...call it what you will, but the music of Devo remains as odd and endearing as it was 25 years ago when the band broke through with "Whip It." While the tunes and musicians may be a bit older, the group always was driven by technology though, so it's not too surprisingly that the band is keeping up with the latest gear--an effort that has now seen its addition to Electro-Voice's artist endorsement program.
Devo leader Mark Mothersbaugh and the EV RE-1 wireless vocal microphone, with a 767a capsule.Always at the forefront of musical innovation (e.g. Devo was one of the first bands to embrace live electronica via PAIA sequencers), the band favors music equipment that sounds and looks unique. Enter EV/Blue and Blue microphones. The band is currently using the EV Blue Raven, EV Blue Cardinal, BLUE Ball, and the BLUE Kickball for instrumentation. The band also deploys a full complement of wireless onstage, including eight channels of EV RE-1 for vocals (N/D767a handheld and HM7 headworn) and guitar/bass. EV N/D468, N/D478, and N/D868 wired microphones are also utilized on the Devo stage.

Electro-Voice
www.electrovoice.com