quot50 Years Of Great Grammy Recordingsquot Highlights

Santa Monica, CA. (February 12, 2008)--Last week, the Producers & Engineers Wing of The Recording Academy celebrated "50 Years of Great Grammy Recordings," an event honoring the contributions made by the creative technologists who transform the vision of music artists into reality.
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Four-time Grammy winner and Recording Academy Chair Jimmy Jam toasted producers and recording engineers as "the technology backbone of the music industry and the magic behind the music." Shown L-R: P&E Wing Executive Director Maureen Droney and Jimmy Jam.Santa Monica, CA. (February 12, 2008)--Last week, the Producers & Engineers Wing of The Recording Academy celebrated "50 Years of Great Grammy Recordings," an event honoring the contributions made by the creative technologists who transform the vision of music artists into reality.

Held at The Village Studios--the birthplace of scores of recordings from Grammy-winning artists including Fleetwood Mac, Aerosmith, and Tom Petty--a legendary recording studio that was celebrating its own 40th anniversary.

At 7 p.m., the doors to The Village were opened to close to 700 guests, consisting of Grammy-winning engineers and producers such as Chris Lord-Alge, John Alagia, Roy Thomas Baker, Ed Cherney, Jimmy Douglass, Geoff Emerick, Al Schmitt, Elliot Scheiner, and more, as well as leading artists including John Mayer, Liz Phair, Keb' Mo', Lucinda Williams, and Once star Glen Hansard.

The Village's various studios were designated to represent the six key technical Grammy categories: Control Room A showcased the music of this year’s nominees for Best Engineered Album Classical and Non-Classical, while a flat-panel video monitor ran a slide show of album art from past winners. Along the same lines, Studio A showed nominees for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical. Studio B showcased Producer Of The Year, Classical and Non-Classical. Control Room D featured the music of this year's nominees for Best Surround Sound Album. Each of these spaces was sponsored by one or more of the event’s manufacturer, technology and lifestyle sponsors, including Cakewalk, Digidesign, Full Sail, JBL Professional, Microsoft, MIX/ReMix, Sennheiser/Neumann, Shure, Waves, Westlake Professional Sales and West L.A. Music.

In Studio F, guests were greeted with a unique interactive aspect of the event: two computer stations where guests could send e-mails to their U.S. Representatives in support of the Performance Rights Act, a legislative initiative sponsored by The Recording Academy and a coalition of music industry organizations. In the words of P&E Wing Executive Director Maureen Droney, this has the power to "right a serious injustice to U.S. musical artists" by enabling recording artists to benefit from terrestrial radio royalties, as they do elsewhere in the world. "This would bring us parity with the rest of the world," she said.

Four-time Grammy winner and Recording Academy Chair Jimmy Jam toasted producers and recording engineers as "the technology backbone of the music industry and the magic behind the music," adding, "Music is alive and well, with a great future."

"In an era of complex and fast-changing technology that is remaking the music industry by the minute, those who produce and engineer the recording of music play a significant role in how this evolution will proceed," said Droney. “The Producers & Engineers Wing of the Recording Academy strives to get these talented individuals the recognition they deserve, both for what they have already accomplished and for the role they will play in the directions music moves in the future.”

Producers & Engineers Wing
www.producersandengineers.com

The Recording Academy
www.grammy.com