Radio Stations Webcast Via New Internet Protocol

Chapel Hill, NC (November 5, 2004)--Ibiblio.org has announced that a team from the North Carolina Networking Initiative (NCNI), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) and the CENTAUR Lab at NC State University's Centennial Campus has enabled ibiblio.org to begin broadcasting two radio streams using Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6).
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Chapel Hill, NC (November 5, 2004)--Ibiblio.org has announced that a team from the North Carolina Networking Initiative (NCNI), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) and the CENTAUR Lab at NC State University's Centennial Campus has enabled ibiblio.org to begin broadcasting two radio streams using Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6).

Ibiblio.org is one of the largest "collections of collections" on the internet. It is a conservancy of freely available information, including software, music, literature, art, history, science, politics, and cultural studies.

IPv6 is the foundation for the next generation internet, which is currently based on version 4 of the Internet Protocol (IPv4). The broadcast streams are accessible to a growing number of computer users worldwide via networks that support the new protocol.

"This is another example of ibiblio being at the forefront of the internet technology curve," said Paul Jones, director of ibiblio.org. "WXYC, UNC-Chapel Hill's student radio station, was the first radio station to provide a 24/7 webcast 10 years ago."

The primary users of IPv6 today are those in the research and education community, the same early-adopter community that fostered the growth of today's internet. NCNI provides the IPv6 support for UNC-CH and ibiblio. It also facilitates the IPv6 connection to Abilene (the Internet2 backbone network) that allows the streams to be picked up by IPv6 users worldwide.

"Much of the benefit of IPv6 will not be apparent to radio listeners initially. They will hear the same high-quality audio stream that ibiblio now provides with IPv4," said John Moore, technical director of CENTAUR Labs. "But from a network engineering perspective, gaining experience in using this new technology will ultimately enable new services, particularly in the area of mobile multimedia."

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www.ibiblio.org