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Red's Hedge Does D5 - ProSoundNetwork.com

Red's Hedge Does D5

New York (April 24, 2009)--The current Simply Red tour finds veteran live engineer Chris 'Privet' Hedge manning the FOH desk,  and the console this time out is a DiGiCo D5 console.
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Chris 'Privet' Hedge, manning his
DiGiCo D5 on the current
Simply Red world tour.New York (April 24, 2009)--The current Simply Red tour finds veteran live engineer Chris 'Privet' Hedge manning the FOH desk, and the console this time out is a DiGiCo D5 console.

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So far, the tour has taken in Thailand, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Brazil, Mexico and the USA, and is now currently cruising through Europe. "I've used the D5 for three years now, with KT Tunstall, Mika, Alicia Keys and now Simply Red," he says. "It has a very natural sound and all the artists I've used it with are primarily organic, live acts. I find the console very easy to lay out and operate intuitively; it's very much a mixer's console.

"I'm using one of Brit Row's Version 4 D5s and I use it very simply. On the current tour, we have 48 mic inputs and, as well as the onboard FX, I have four engines of TC Electronic 6000 and a Yamaha SPX990 plumbed into it. The only external inserts are an Avalon 737 on the lead vocal and a Waves MaxxBCL. I use one stereo Toms group and four stereo matrices: one to an XTA 448 for EQ and zoning, a spare, one for CDR and one to a distribution amp for media.

"We've been using a variety of different speaker systems and I save a show session file for each manufacturer, as there are slight, but crucial input EQ differences from system to system. I have a snapshot for each song, although only faders, cuts, FX, midi and aux sends are automated. A good number of inputs are completely 'safe'. The snapshots give me a basic DCA shape and any FX changes for the start of each tune, and after that, I just mix.

"For me, though, the best thing about this D5 has been its reliability on the world tour. No amount of chucking it on and off airplanes, lorries and forklifts has caused a blip in its operation. Naturally, as with any equipment on such a hard tour, a little regular tightening up and re-seating goes a long way. And threatening it with a hammer..."

DiGiCo
www.digico.org