Report Examines Hi-Def Disc Adoption

Port Washington, NY (September 20, 2007)--More consumers are aware of HD DVD than they are of Blu-ray Disc, but few plan to purchase a player for either, according to a survey by The NPD Group. The report suggests the industry should do more to raise consumer awareness and make more hi-res disc titles available.
Author:
Publish date:

Port Washington, NY (September 20, 2007)--More consumers are aware of HD DVD than they are of Blu-ray Disc, but few plan to purchase a player for either, according to a survey by The NPD Group. The report suggests the industry should do more to raise consumer awareness and make more hi-res disc titles available.

NPD's new "High Definition Video Report Series" examines consumer awareness, ownership, usage patterns and intent to purchase high-definition players and content since these new technologies were introduced last year.

Among those who currently own HDTVs, 52 percent are aware of the availability of high-def DVD players, but only 11 percent expressed strong intentions to buy one in the next six months. Seventy-three percent of HDTV owners reported that their current traditional-format DVD player still works well for them, while 62 percent said they are waiting for the prices of high-definition players to fall.

While 29 percent of respondents were aware of HD DVD, just 20 percent had heard of Blu-ray Disc (BD). Consumers who purchased a BD player reported that they did so because they believed it was superior to HD DVD; while those who purchased an HD DVD player did so because the price was lower than a BD player.

According to NPD, familiarity with these formats is primarily coming from exposure to marketing. Forty-one percent of consumers who say they are familiar with BD players and content gained awareness through ads and TV commercials. The same is true for HD DVD (42 percent). Nearly one-in-five consumers reported learning about the devices from friends and family.

NPD's research shows that the overwhelming majority (64 percent) of DVDs purchased by high-definition owners are standard definition. However, the primary reason consumers reported buying a traditional DVD was that the high-def disc was not available.

One encouraging sign is that existing HD DVD and BD consumers are trading up from standard def. According to NPD, early adopters plan to replace nearly a quarter (23 percent) of their current collections with either HD DVD or BD. High-def player owners would like to buy nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of upcoming new releases in the new formats and only 37 percent in the existing standard DVD format.

The NPD Group
www.npd.com