Resta Discovers Crowley And Tripp Microphones - ProSoundNetwork.com

Resta Discovers Crowley And Tripp Microphones

Boston, MA (September 16, 2005)--Producer/engineer/composer Anthony J. Resta has recorded, mixed, produced and written with a wide variety of notable artists including Duran Duran, Collective Soul, Sir Elton John, Shawn Mullins, Letters To Cleo, Blondie, and Guster. At his Boston-based recording facility, dubbed Studio Bopnique Musique, Resta recently worked with all three of the new Crowley and Tripp ribbon microphones--the Studio Vocalist, the Soundstage Image, and the Proscenium.
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Boston, MA (September 16, 2005)--Producer/engineer/composer Anthony J. Resta has recorded, mixed, produced and written with a wide variety of notable artists including Duran Duran, Collective Soul, Sir Elton John, Shawn Mullins, Letters To Cleo, Blondie, and Guster. At his Boston-based recording facility, dubbed Studio Bopnique Musique, Resta recently worked with all three of the new Crowley and Tripp ribbon microphones--the Studio Vocalist, the Soundstage Image, and the Proscenium.
Anthony J. Resta finds a new twist in Crowley and Tripp ribbon microphones"These are really interesting microphones," Resta explained. "There's something really different about them. I've always loved ribbons, but most have a characteristic that people refer to as 'dark' and are generally better suited for things like percussion and guitars. I've used the Royers, the Coles, and others. But what I've noticed most about Crowley and Tripp mics is their openness and natural brightness. It's amazing."

Crowley and Tripp's flagship model is the Studio Vocalist, a large ribbon microphone with a figure-eight pattern that is specially built for voice recording applications. According to Crowley and Tripp, the Studio Vocalist keeps a low noise floor, offers increased fullness via a smooth proximity effect, and has a symmetric frequency response well suited for minimizing off-axis coloration. Similarly built, the Soundstage Image is designed for comparatively uncolored sonic characteristics. And the Proscenium is said to provide a vintage-flavored warmness with non-vintage qualities such as efficiency and high output power. Crowley and Tripp microphones feature stainless steel bodies, hearty construction, and are sold direct by Soundwave Research Laboratories.

While recording Berklee College of Music vocal professor Didi Stewart, Resta found that he wasn't the only one that felt strongly about Crowley and Tripp microphones. "Didi said that in 25 years, she's never heard a microphone so dynamic and open," explained Resta about their use of the Studio Vocalist. "She was astounded, and that's more impressive than my bragging about it--she's an amazing singer."

According to Resta, using each of his three Crowley and Tripp mics equally has provided him with plenty of "ideal front-ends" to crucial signal paths. "I'm using them all," he declareed. "I've used the Studio Vocalist on strings--it's fantastic on cello, viola, and violin. And the Soundstage Image sounds great on horns. We recently worked on the new Boston Horns record, and they're really fussy about their horn sounds. Chief engineer Karyadi Sutedja put the Soundstage on the flugelhorn and they just flipped over it."

In describing his affinity for Crowley and Tripp ribbon microphones for digital recording, Resta recalls his experiences in using other high-quality choices in the past. "Many of the fancy mics I've used over the years were built for analog recording," he explained. "Many of them had extra high-end, and when it hit analog tape, the edges were 'rounded' off. Nowadays we're recording nearly everything digitally. I find that the Crowley and Tripp mics have a certain 'saturation' sound to them that seems to emulate tape in a way. It's their sound and the extra bit of ribbon warmth that really goes a long way in the digital recording world."

The Studio Vocalist, the Soundstage Image, and the Proscenium are priced at $1,395, $1,395, and $1,485 respectively. On pricing, Resta commented, "I think they have just ridiculously low prices. Once people hear them, they would still buy them if they cost double that amount. They're that good. I have an RCA 77, supposedly one of the best ribbon microphones ever made, and I don't even plug it in anymore. I'll probably sell it on eBay."

For more information about Crowley and Tripp as well as their new ten-day trial program for auditioning one of their fine ribbon microphones, contact Soundwave Research Labs.

Soundwave Research Laboratories, Inc.
www.soundwaveresearch.com