Rock Radio Listeners Sound Off About New Technology - ProSoundNetwork.com

Rock Radio Listeners Sound Off About New Technology

Southfield, MI (April 28, 2005)--New technology, such as satellite radio and iPods, is having an impact on Rock Radio listeners. But most believe that radio is a venerable medium that will not be replaced by these new media anytime soon, according to a web poll just released by Rock Radio consulting firm Jacobs Media. The web poll was conducted during March-April among more than 19,000 listeners of Classic Rock, Active Rock, and Alternative radio stations from around the U.S.
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Southfield, MI (April 28, 2005)--New technology, such as satellite radio and iPods, is having an impact on Rock Radio listeners. But most believe that radio is a venerable medium that will not be replaced by these new media anytime soon, according to a web poll just released by Rock Radio consulting firm Jacobs Media. The web poll was conducted during March-April among more than 19,000 listeners of Classic Rock, Active Rock, and Alternative radio stations from around the U.S.

"Rock radio listeners are enjoying and utilizing many of the new ways to receive music and information, but it's also too early to make funeral arrangements for radio," said Jacobs Media president Fred Jacobs.

According to the poll, Rock listeners are actively involved with other media, including IMing, text messaging on cell phones, and video game play. This is especially true with younger listeners, who provide clues about what adults will be doing in the next few years. However, radio and more mature media, such as television, still garner the largest segment of media usage.

Jacobs pointed out, "It provides a fascinating hierarchy of how Rock listeners are making use of the new technologies available to them. It also shows that one of the loudest new media voices--satellite radio--is still very much in its infancy, despite the onslaught of PR."

One of the big findings involves iPods and similar portable MP3 players. More than one-fifth (21 percent) of the sample already own one. Of those who do not, four in ten (43 percent) say they are very or somewhat likely to purchase one this year. Yet, two-thirds (67 percent) of the Rock Radio audience disagree with the notion that iPod-like devices will replace radio for music anytime soon.

Jacobs Media
www.jacobsmedia.com