Sennheiser Heads To Georgia Church Via Canada - ProSoundNetwork.com

Sennheiser Heads To Georgia Church Via Canada

Cumming, GA (February 5, 2009)--When Eulises Canada recently joined First Redeemer Church as its creative arts director, he initiated several technical upgrades to the audio system, including the addition of Sennheiser ew 165 G2 handheld microphone and ew 112 G2 lavalier transmitter/receiver systems.
Author:
Publish date:

Cumming, GA (February 5, 2009)--When Eulises Canada recently joined First Redeemer Church as its creative arts director, he initiated several technical upgrades to the audio system, including the addition of Sennheiser ew 165 G2 handheld microphone and ew 112 G2 lavalier transmitter/receiver systems.

Two main buildings reside on First Redeemer's campus. The first contains a 2,000-seat sanctuary in which a full orchestra and a 200-voice choir deliver a blended service every weekend with Pastor Dr. Richard Lee. The service is broadcast throughout the country via the "There's Hope America" network. The second building contains classrooms, student facilities, a family center, and smaller auditoriums where, for example, the youth band performs.

Following Canada's direction, the church now has 25 Sennheiser wireless channels split almost evenly between the ew 112 G2 lavaliers and the ew 165 G2 handhelds. Most of the systems serve the main sanctuary, but others reside with the youth band and the class rooms. Canada coordinated their frequencies by first finding an open channel for one system and then using the "auto search" feature for the remaining systems.

"The 865 super-cardioid condenser capsule does a great job at bending to the faults of a weak singer so they come off sounding better, perhaps, than they really are," he said. "At the same time, strong singers sound exceptional even with very little processing." When he needs to, Canada switches out the stock 865 capsule for Sennheiser capsules with different polar patterns or frequency responses.

Canada's other large purchase was a Digidesign Venue console to wrestle 96 inputs from stage and interface them with a Pro Tools system capable of recording or playing 120 channels. By recording every channel, the Venue gives him the chance to do "virtual sound check" between services. As the budget allows, Canada will replace almost all of the wired microphones on stage that currently capture the orchestra. "I currently have Neumann KM 183 and KM 184s for the choir, strings, and brass," he said, "and they're going to stay! But I'd like to replace the rest with high-end orchestral mics from Sennheiser and Neumann to get the sort of classic sound that we don't quite have right now."

Sennheiser USA
www.sennheiserusa.com