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Shure Finds Hope in Memphis

New York (July 17, 2008)-- Hope Presbyterian Church in Memphis recently added 5,000 more seats as part of a new structure housing supplemental sanctuary space. With more room came more audio requirements, however, and that showed up in a number of ways, including the addition of 18 channels of Shure UHF-R wireless to be used for church events like touring artists, holiday pageants, and more.

New York (July 17, 2008)– Hope Presbyterian Church in Memphis recently added 5,000 more seats as part of a new structure housing supplemental sanctuary space. With more room came more audio requirements, however, and that showed up in a number of ways, including the addition of 18 channels of Shure UHF-R wireless to be used for church events like touring artists, holiday pageants, and more.

Coordinate the new wireless plan was Jim McCandliss of Maui-based Sound Investment Enterprises, Inc. (yes, in Hawaii). “It’s a wireless world at the church,” he said. “They have eight wireless personal monitoring systems in use simultaneously, 10 to 15 radios used by a sizable team of parking attendants, wireless intercom for video operators, and a wide variety of legacy systems that are still functioning just fine and in use.”

A Shure dealer since 1977, McCandliss turned to UHF-R wireless systems. “What really sold it for us in this application were the KSM9 handheld transmitters we selected,” he said. “The mic was perfect for use with our planar speakers–together they were a really nice complement. Every nuance and minute detail that the mic captures is heard through the speakers.”

As an aid to cutting through the miasma of RF enshrouding the new sanctuary, McCandliss called upon the help of Shure engineers, who conducted some research and recommended frequencies of operation for the UHF-R systems.

“As with many projects, we were crunched for time on this one,” McCandliss relates. “Using the recommended parameters given to us by Shure, we simply used each UHF-R receiver’s scan function to choose the best channels of operation. We locked-in to those settings–they proved to be perfect, and the transmitters were automatically synched at the same time. The whole process took less than a second for each receiver.”

The inherent time-saving nature of setup was vital to McCandliss, as there was no time given to him for a trial shakedown period before handing the keys of the system over to church FOH engineer Willie Pevear.

Shure Incorporated
www.shure.com

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