Shure Slides Into Home At ATT Park

San Francisco, CA (October 10, 2006)--Baseball fans have gotten spoiled in recent years with new ballparks that provide the best in modern amenities yet have that classic architecture--and in that regard, few can beat San Francisco's AT&T Park, home of the Giants. The SR staff there also has a few modern amenities too, including a new Shure UHF-R wireless mic system.
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San Francisco, CA (October 10, 2006)--Baseball fans have gotten spoiled in recent years with new ballparks that provide the best in modern amenities yet have that classic architecture--and in that regard, few can beat San Francisco's AT&T Park, home of the Giants. The SR staff there also has a few modern amenities too, including a new Shure UHF-R wireless mic system.

James Dukleth of Oakland Audio Video Service, Inc., the company that reconfigured the park's wireless blueprint for the current season, noted, "The audio system here was installed in 2000 when the park opened, but by last year, it was due for a wireless upgrade. We're a big Shure house, so we pulled some units from our rental stock and let the Giants use them for the balance of the season. This year, we received a go-ahead to install a permanent system, so we went with Shure's new UHF-R."

Wireless needs at AT&T park extend beyond the normal reach of pregame activities, announcements made from the field, and the national anthem. There is a rousing chorus of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" frequently led from the field during the seventh inning stretch, and for the younger fans, a "Junior Announcer" program. A popular in-game segment, the latter begins with the selection of a pint-sized Giants fan from the crowd who is then given the opportunity to introduce the first three batters of a designated inning. Ensuring that the power indicators stay lit all year on AT&T Park's wireless receivers when the Giants take a break in the off-season, the units switch gears and manage input for other events including monster truck and supercross challenges.

A total of eight UHF-R channels are used within the park along with a pair of active UA870WB paddle-style antennas. Transmitters across the board are handheld UR2 units sporting venerable SM58 capsules.

"The goal here is to stay ahead of the competition," Michael Uchacz, Oakland Audio Video's on-site system operator explains. "There are a lot of wireless frequencies in the area, as well as maritime frequencies out in the bay, and they are a constantly changing group that is ready to pick a fight every day. On my end with the UHF-R systems, it's an easy one-button proposition to scan before each game for the best frequencies available, and then lock them in for the game. Once the frequencies are selected, it's clear sailing--you just set a level and go."

"The sound quality here at the park is better than ever, it seems everyone has noticed the newfound clarity," Uchacz adds. "The whole wireless scheme is more robust. We had the systems installed and tuned within a regular work day, and have yet to experience any RF problems."

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