Simple Minds Keeps It Uncomplicated

New York (March 24, 2006)--Simple Minds is currently undertaking a world tour in support of the recent album, Black & White 050505, playing all manner of venues, from the most intimate to the vast. The tour is predominantly one-niters, so the tight turnarounds and diversity in size of venues demand a flexible and easily programmed sound system.
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New York (March 24, 2006)--Simple Minds is currently undertaking a world tour in support of the recent album, Black & White 050505, playing all manner of venues, from the most intimate to the vast. The tour is predominantly one-niters, so the tight turnarounds and diversity in size of venues demand a flexible and easily programmed sound system.
Simple Minds is currently touring the UK with a Concert Sound-supplied rig based around a DiGiCo D1, Adamson loudspeakers and an XTA kit.Sub-hired from rental company Concert Sound to main supplier EML for the UK leg of the tour, it comprises an Adamson Y10 line array, half of which is flown and half ground stacked, plus EAW subs. System control is courtesy of seven XTA DP226 crossovers via a PC tablet using XTA's proprietary AudioCore software and its Walkabout Wireless kit.

"We have found the XTA kit offers plenty of scope with EQ and boost and the internal headroom is more than adequate for our needs," said Front of House engineer Patrick Demoustier. Concert Sound system technician Arron Ross added: "We're using Adamson Axis Shooter software alongside XTA AudioCore 8.1. It's so easy to use and has allowed me to tune the room in fine detail."

Demoustier is mixing both Simple Minds and the support band on a DiGiCo D1 Live. Having one of the first models off the production line, he took delivery without an instruction manual. "But I didn't need one, because it really is very simple," he said with a smile.

Demoustier has been with the band since 1997 and knows better than most that Simple Minds does not necessarily equal simple sounds. "The band is well known for its imaginative 'soundscapes' and effects," he said. "On tour, they expect to sound as true to their original recordings as possible. This demands plenty of pre-programming for each song, which means I need a quick and easily programmable digital console. To manage that on an analog desk would be impossible, but to set it up on the D1 is easy."

For Demoustiern the D1 has helped cut down on outboard by over 50 percent. "Some people say digital is very expensive," he commented. "But, if you take into account the time it saves in setting up, the space it saves in the truck and the reduction in staff required to manage it, you'll find this just isn't so."

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