Stephen St Croix Curtis Marshall - 1948-2006

Los Angeles, CA (May 10, 2006)--We are sad to report the death of Stephen St. Croix - aka Steven Curtis Marshall - who died early Saturday morning, May 6, following a lengthy battle with melanoma. We offer condolences to his wife and many friends around the world.
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By Mel Lambert.

Los Angeles, CA (May 10, 2006)--We are sad to report the death of Stephen St. Croix - aka Steven Curtis Marshall - who died early Saturday morning, May 6, following a lengthy battle with melanoma. We offer condolences to his wife and many friends around the world.

Stephen was a complex, multifaceted individual who was equally at ease with performance, production, and equipment design, as well as being a respected columnist in the pro audio industry. While a professional musician and engineer/producer, he founded Marshall Electronic, under whose auspices he designed the Marshall Time Modulator.

He worked on a number of landmark sessions during the past three decades, including Stevie Wonder's Songs in the Key of Life and The Secret Life of Plants. He designed Lightning Studios in the late-seventies--one of the first full-featured project facilities--and formed Marshall-Quantec to import and support the legendary Quantec Room Simulator, followed by the XL Digital Signal Processor.

He invented the 'Revectorization' process used to reconstruct the soundtracks for motion pictures, including Gone with The Wind, Wizard of Oz, Easter Parade and Yankee Doodle Dandy. He became a technical editor/consultant to R-E/P magazine and created the "Living with Technology" column. He later moved to MIX magazine, where for 18 years he authored the popular "Fast Lane" column.

He was a design and marketing consultant for companies including Hybrid Arts, Wadia and Symetrix. In 1995, he co-founded Intelligent Devices, which designed, developed and marketed several software plug-ins, and the highly regarded PARIS digital audio workstation in conjunction with EMU-Ensoniq. In addition to offering custom products and services for the pro-audio industry, ID also designs and develops a number of speech recovery and processing systems for Federal agency and law-enforcement applications. He was also invited to serve on a National Archives committee looking into the possible contents of an 18.5-minute gap on the infamous Watergate tapes.

Outside of the professional audio field, he was a talented designer of automotive and motorcycle engines, working with a number of manufacturers on leading-edge turbo-charged systems. This was all in service of his never-ending quest for maximum acceleration and G-forces.

He was a very unique individual who will be missed by many for a very long time.