Studio Owner/Producer Sues White Stripes

Detroit, MI (April 18, 2006)--Jim Diamond, owner of Detroit-based Ghetto Recorders, has initiated a lawsuit against The White Stripes. According to Billboard, he is demanding royalties for his work creating the band's sound as a co-producer on the act's 1999 self-titled debut, and mix engineer on its follow-up, 2000's Be Still. The suit was filed in Detroit's U.S. District Court, and a June 12 trial date is set.
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Detroit, MI (April 18, 2006)--Jim Diamond, owner of Detroit-based Ghetto Recorders, has initiated a lawsuit against The White Stripes. According to Billboard, he is demanding royalties for his work creating the band's sound as a co-producer on the act's 1999 self-titled debut, and mix engineer on its follow-up, 2000's Be Still. The suit was filed in Detroit's U.S. District Court, and a June 12 trial date is set.

Since opening its doors in 1996, recording at Ghetto Recorders has become something of a must for garage bands; the studio has hosted the likes of the Von Bondies, the Fleshtones, the Paybacks, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, the Mooney Suzuki and the Bumpin' Uglies, among others. Recent album projects for Diamond include recording and co-producing the Pittsburgh band, Camera, as well as an album by the Brooklyn band, The Little Killers.

The White Stripes claimed in court documents that they paid Diamond $35 an hour for recording time at Ghetto.

Diamond told Billboard, "It's not just about fun and games. I understand this is a business." Meanwhile, the band's lawyer, Bert Deixler, responded, "It is a meritless case which will be defended with vigor."

Ghetto Recorders
www.ghettorecorders.com