SymNet Goes To Harvard - ProSoundNetwork.com

SymNet Goes To Harvard

Cambridge, MA (May 5, 2006)--One of the JFK School of Government at Harvard University's primary lecture halls recently received an audio system upgrade installed by Adtech Systems, a Wayland, MA, AV systems integrator. The company installed a new zoned, mix-minus microphone/ loudspeaker system; the project was headed by Adtech's design engineer, Michael Merrill.
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Cambridge, MA (May 5, 2006)--One of the JFK School of Government at Harvard University's primary lecture halls recently received an audio system upgrade installed by Adtech Systems, a Wayland, MA, AV systems integrator. The company installed a new zoned, mix-minus microphone/ loudspeaker system; the project was headed by Adtech's design engineer, Michael Merrill.

SymNet DSP Audio Matrix is part of the John F. Kennedy School of Government renovation, which was handled by Adtech Systems, a Wayland, MA integrator.Key to the hall's new audio system architecture is a SymNet DSP Audio Matrix from Symetrix. The digital signal processing, mixing and routing system distributes audio from 52 microphones to some 120 loudspeakers. The mix-minus configuration allows a speaker's voice to be routed from the microphone to all speakers in the hall, with the exception of those in the speaker's immediate vicinity.

Employing two SymNet 8x8 units, four Break-in 12 devices and two Break-out 12s, Merrill was able to configure a solution that established 27 loudspeaker zones, and the ability to route microphone audio to the appropriate zones.

"SymNet was the only cost-effective way to juggle that many inputs and outputs. It was the best choice to create a large matrix, mix-minus system that eliminated the possibility of feedback to the speaker's vicinity, but allowed voice to be sent to the other 26 of the 27 zones in the hall," said Michael Merrill, the Adtech engineer who designed the solution. Using SymNet, Adtech was able to replace a mechanical, analog system in the hall that employed no zoning, but rather doorbell-style relay buttons that could be pushed by the speaker to activate the microphone and mute the loudspeakers in his or her vicinity.

"One of SymNet's most helpful features in this application was having the proprietary buses that could be assigned to either send or receive," he said. In addition to routing audio from microphones to the loudspeaker zones in the tiered, theatre-style seating lecture hall, SymNet also is configured to send audio to recording devices.

Other equipment used in the renovation were Tang W3-594S three-inch shielded loudspeakers, Audio Technica U891R boundary microphones with push-to-talk switches, and Shure MX418C gooseneck mics.

Symetrix
www.symetrixaudio.com