SymNet Supports A Classic - ProSoundNetwork.com

SymNet Supports A Classic

Athens, GA (December 22, 2006)--A popular convention center in Athens, GA--the Classic Center--recently updated several room combining systems, dating back as much as ten years, into a single integrated solution. Technical Services Audio Visual (TSAV) installed a SymNet Network Audio Solution that integrates Symetrix DSP products with proprietary technology, and combines routing with wireless control of signal processing anywhere within the facility.
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Athens, GA (December 22, 2006)--A popular convention center in Athens, GA--the Classic Center--recently updated several room combining systems, dating back as much as ten years, into a single integrated solution. Technical Services Audio Visual (TSAV) installed a SymNet Network Audio Solution that integrates Symetrix DSP products with proprietary technology, and combines routing with wireless control of signal processing anywhere within the facility.

The system is based around a SymNet 8x8 DSP unit and a series of SymNet BreakIn12 and BreakOut12 expansion devices, used to create a 48x40 matrix that routes audio throughout the various ballrooms and breakout spaces. "It's a pretty complex setup," said Pete Dugas, president of TSAV. "We've created a control interface that speaks to the Symetrix system via RS232 and recalls not only preset configurations, but can take any input to any output or any combination thereof."

A major feature of TSAV's value-added proprietary technology is the ability for event organizers to take a laptop computer with a Wi-Fi connection anywhere in the complex and control the audio on a virtual mixing console. "The Symetrix equipment was key to that," said Dugas, whose company created a browser-based GUI that provides channel-by-channel control of parametric EQ and input and output gains via the SymNet 8x8 DSP unit's processing functionality.

"It's really convenient for the operators," he said. "Rather than dragging a mixing board into one of these breakout rooms, they can plug the microphones in and sit at the back of the room with a laptop and control the sound from there wirelessly."

Dugas offered the annual Georgia Power training sessions as an example of the ways in which the room combining system is expected to operate. "Twenty or so different breakout spaces get content from one another at different times. One room might be able to listen in on another, or there might be a public address that goes to any and all combinations of these spaces." Furthermore, he noted, "There is background music that comes from everything from a CD player to a laptop, an iPod to a satellite radio feed."

According to Dugas, the recent major renovations added nine new breakout spaces in the Grand Hall, complicating the design brief to integrate existing audio and visual systems in the new construction with the historic portions of the facility. "Renovations over the last ten years have integrated room combining systems into the ballrooms that had some effect and worked pretty well," he reported. "The large Athena Ballroom was the original installation. Then the standards that we put in place in the Foundry Ballrooms over the last five years were expanded to these new rooms."

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