Telarcs Bishop Uses Z-Systems Detanglers - ProSoundNetwork.com

Telarcs Bishop Uses Z-Systems Detanglers

Cincinnati, OH (December 17, 2003)--Michael Bishop, Telarc's Grammy Award-winning recording engineer, names his Z-Systems Detangler among the critical tools for high-resolution audio mastering. "Back in the early days of digital recording, all you had to deal with was a DAT machine and maybe an old Sony 1610 system," said Bishop. "Today we're working with more digital devices than you can count, running at a variety of sample rates. Managing the flow of this digital data is critical to our mastering process. We lean on our Z-Systems Detangler heavily. It routes digital data through our entire system."
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Cincinnati, OH (December 17, 2003)--Michael Bishop, Telarc's Grammy Award-winning recording engineer, names his Z-Systems Detangler among the critical tools for high-resolution audio mastering. "Back in the early days of digital recording, all you had to deal with was a DAT machine and maybe an old Sony 1610 system," said Bishop. "Today we're working with more digital devices than you can count, running at a variety of sample rates. Managing the flow of this digital data is critical to our mastering process. We lean on our Z-Systems Detangler heavily. It routes digital data through our entire system."

Currently, Telarc owns three Sony/Sonoma DSD, Windows NT workstations, a pair of Sonic Solutions PCM Mac workstations, another two SADiE PCM workstations running on Windows 98, and one SADiE Windows XP workstation that handles both DSD and PCM formats. "Each of our three sound rooms can access any of these systems, and we can use a variety of converters to connect them at different sample rates," said Bishop.

Telarc has three in-house mastering rooms tied together through a common equipment room. "That's typical these days," added Bishop. "What's unusual is the variety of different systems that we network. Most facilities pick a format, generally PCM, and go with it. The vast majority of our releases begin with high-resolution source material, and we turn out high-resolution masters for both CD and SACD release. To accomplish this task we need to have a variety of digital systems hooked together. And that's where the Detangler becomes so important to our workflow."

The Z-Systems z-64.64r Digital Detangler is an AES digital router that Bishop accesses via software. "We might, for example, tell the Detangler to route AES signals through a digital mixer, and then tell it to send the same material to the PCM inputs of a DSD system, which will then convert an existing master to DSD," suggested Bishop. "We can accomplish all of this without leaving the room."

Bishop mixed the recent Heads Up label release Word Of Mouth, a big band tribute to Jaco Pastorius. "I tracked that on a Digidesign Pro Tools HD system running at 96kHz/24-bits. We had an average of about 32 tracks per cut on that album, which we mixed on a combination of analog and digital equipment. Using the Detangler, I flew off sub mixes from Pro Tools to one of our SADiE workstations, which was also running at 96kHz/24-bits. At the same time, we used the Detangler to route the signals through D/A converters and onto an analog console."

Marcus Miller's last Telarc release, M2 will be released in surround sound early next year, and Bishop is eager to begin work on it. "Marcus has many different musical voices going on in his compositions, and an unbelievable amount of textures, so the project is a natural for surround sound," said Bishop. "Typically, I'll keep the stuff that drives a tune up front, and use the surrounds to play with the ear candy. We'll be using two Detanglers on this project, because the album has many tracks of material on it that have to be routed to different inputs in our systems."

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